Live Music: Los Lobos and Los Lonely Boys at Valley Performing Arts Center

November 10, 2014

By Mike Finkelstein

Northridge, CA. For several years now, Los Lobos and Los Lonely Boys have been touring together to the continuing satisfaction of their solid fan bases. Sometimes Los Lobos headlines, other times Los Lonely Boys headlines. The two bands teamed up Saturday night at the Valley Performing Arts Center on the CSUN campus for a fun evening of shared music with Los Lobos closing the show.

Saturday’s performance was a loud one. While most rock concerts are going to be that way, it’s noteworthy that the Valley Performing Arts Center doesn’t often present louder rock concerts. The VAC is a gorgeous building but the interior of the main auditorium is comprised mostly of wooden walls and baffles designed to direct the sound optimally. It seems that this actually works best for softer performances with lower volumes. The sound rattled around inside noticeably on Saturday night, reducing the high ends to a sizzling hiss. It was way too challenging just to make out the lyrics of the tunes.

While Los Lobos have been together in excess of forty years, Los Lonely Boys have been at it for nearly 20 years themselves (!). And one would think that as he band’s three brothers — Ringo, Jojo, and Henry Garza — were growing up in San Angelo, Texas they had to be inspired by the success they saw Los Lobos have playing any style of music they wanted to – masterfully and to huge acceptance. So touring with them and knowing them is coming full circle. After LLB closed their hour-long opening set, their equipment stayed where it was. It only stays if it’s going to be used later on, after all. The LLB’s were far from done.

Los Lonely Boys

Los Lonely Boys

Throughout the evening nearly all the members of each band came out to play with their touring buddies. The frontlines of both groups are all multi-instrumental so they could and did play drums or percussion as well as their guitars, regional stringed instruments, and accordions.

Aside from their ace musicianship, one of the biggest appeals of Los Lobos is how they have consistently embraced all their musical influences and worked them into the repertoire. Whether it’s traditional Mexican folk music, blues-rock, rockabilly, folk, pop or country, these guys will play it like no one else’s business and on Saturday night we got a bit of everything. In a song like “Kiko and the Lavender Moon,” it all came together. There was a simple but driving bass line, and between the lyrics, Berlin’s baritone sax, David Hidalgo’s accordion, and the timbre of his and Cesar Rojas’ voices the atmosphere was something to get lost in.

Los Lobos

Los Lobos

Having grown come up in LA in the late 60’s/early 70’s the guys in Los Lobos got to immerse themselves in all the exceptional music of those times on the radio and with vinyl records. Then they added the traditional music that was around them in the neighborhood. It makes for a uniquely rich blend of styles. Whatever the wolves play it never sounds remotely like a stretch. They do the blues-rock style very well, with songs like “Shakin’, Shakin’, Shakes,” and “Don’t Worry Baby.” Rojas’ guitar, in particular, was in the sweet spot for these tunes. His amp was ready to jump off the chair! But it was the Los Lobos rhythm section of Conrad Lozano on bass and Enrique Gonzalez on drums, wound tight and swinging, which took it to a different level. Can’t say enough good things about the power of the bass and drums being dialed in. As bass players who lay down a great groove for each tune go, Conrad Lozano is exemplary. He was grinning ear to ear for the whole ride on Saturday.

About half way through Los Lonely Boys’ opening set, Hidalgo (guitar), Berlin (baritone sax), and Perez (guitar) sat in with the band. Afterwards, bassist Jojo Garza admitted that every time they get to jam with the wolves it’s a dream come true for himself and his brothers. The good vibe was obvious on all the faces onstage. It was a night built on the simple joy of playing music with your friends for people who are right there with you.

The evening ended with a blistering version of “La Bamba.” We’ve all heard this song many times and probably noticed how much it sounds like “Twist and Shout.” But it is an historic tune. Although it’s a traditional Mexican folk song, it was made enormously popular by Ritchie Valens, of Pacoima, in the ‘50’s when he gave it a rock ‘n roll treatment. Los Lobos made the song a customized rock ‘n roll hit again when the movie about Valens’ tragic life came out in the late 80’s. So, it was only fitting that Henry Garza and Cesar Rojas would raise the bar to pump each other up trading hot solos in the middle of the tune. Both men and the audience, too, were having a blast … which is just what we all showed up for.

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To read more posts by Mike Finkelstein click HERE.


Picks of the Weekend in Los Angeles: Nov. 6 – 9

November 6, 2014

By Don Heckman

Steve Tyrell

Steve Tyrell

- Nov. 6 – 9. (Thurs. – Sun.) Steve Tyrell. Add an amiable Texas twang to a jaunty sense of swing and a convincing way with a lyric, and that still doesn’t add up to the magic that happens when Tyrell digs into the Great American Songbook. Catalina Bar & Grill. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com (323) 466-2210.

Lani Hall and Herb Alpert

Lani Hall and Herb Alpert

- Nov. 6. (Thurs.) Herb Alpert and Lani Hall. The veteran jazz trumpeter/painter/sculptor and his vocally superb wife are back again at their home base – Alpert’s jazz friendly, elegant Bel Air club. They’ll no doubt be working over material for their current touring. And that’ll be a musically captivating gift for anyone who can squeeze into what will no doubt be a full house crowd. But it’ll be worth the effort. Click HERE to read a review of the dynamic duo’s most recent appearance at.  Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- Nov. 6. (Thurs.) David Ornette Cherry. He’s the son of trumpeter Don Cherry, who worked frequently with free jazz icon Ornette Coleman– thus David Ornette Cherry’s middle name. A keyboard player with his own unique approach to contemporary improvisation, he’s an imaginative jazz artist who deserves a hearing on his own right. The Blue Whale.  (213) 620-0908.

Los Lobos

Los Lobos

- Nov. 8. (Sat.) Los Lobos and Los Lonely Boys. The mutiple Grammy-winning group from Los Angeles are one of the popworld’s most eclectic ensembles. Blending everything from Latin pop and Chicano rock to TexMex and Americana their music has a fascinating body-moving appeal. Opening the bill, Texas’ Los Lonely Boys follow a similar musical path. Valley Performing Arts Center.  (818) 677-8800.

- Nov. 8. (Sat.) Dimitri Matheny Quartet. Matheny’s warm, engaging flugelhorn playing has thoroughly established him as one of the most emotionally expressive improvisers of his generation. He performs with the sterling backing of Joe Bagg, piano, Pat Senatore, bass, Dick Weller, drums. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Johnny Mathis

Johnny Mathis

- Nov. 8. (Sat.) Johnny Mathis. He doesn’t show up often any more in the Southland, so don’t miss this opportunity to hear the hit-maker of the ‘6os and 70s up close in action. Segerstrom Center for the Arts.  (714) 556-2787.

- Nov. 8. (Sat.) The New West Symphony. Marcelo Lehninger conducts the gifted players of the NWS in Brahms’ Symphony No. 2, and the Dvorak Concerto in B minor for cello and orchestra, featuring cellist Lynn Harrell. The Cavli Theatre at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. (805) 449-2100.

HIGHLIGHT EVENT: SATURDAY AND SUNDAY NOVEMBER 8 & 9

The 2014 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Trumpet Competition and All-Star Gala Concert

Thelonious Monk

The annual jazz competitions produced by the Thelonious Monk Institute are among the most celebrated jazz events of the year. And the 2014 installment is no exception. This year’s competition again showcases a talented, ambitious group of young players. The semi-finalists will first meet at U.C.L.A.’s Schoenberg Hall on Saturday, Nov. 8. (The semi-final event is free and open to the public.)

The three finalists will then perform in the Competition’s Gala event on Sunday, Nov. 9 at Dolby Hall. The distinguished panel of judges for both stages of the competition includes trumpeters Ambrose Akinmusire, Terence Blanchard, Randy Brecker, Roy Hargrove, Quincy Jones and Arturo Sandoval.

Following the finalists’ performances and the selection of this year’s winner, an All-Star Gala concert will feature Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Terri Lyne Carrington, Ron Carter, Vinnie Colaiuta, Jimmy Heath, Marcus Miller, Dianne Reeves and others.

In another highlight of the Gala, the Institute will present its prestigious Founders Award to President Bill Clinton.

The Thelonious Monk Institute 2014 International Jazz Trumpet Competition  (310) 206-9700.


Live Music: Hall and Oates at The Greek Theatre

October 28, 2014

by James M. DeFrances

Los Angeles, CA.  No introduction? No problem…Daryl Hall and John Oates commenced their show Sunday night at the Greek theater in Los Angeles after Mutlu, the opening act, without any prior announcement. As a matter of fact at 8:45 they were exactly 15 minutes ahead of schedule. So early that the audience, expecting a 9 p.m. start, was abruptly surprised when the intro from the 1982 number one mega-hit “Maneater” boomed over the sold out amphitheater’s PA system. The lights were quickly brought down and Los Angeles was set for an evening of memories, Hall and Oates style.

Hall & Oates and their band

Hall & Oates and their band

The duo’s 16 song set seemed to go by “in the blink of an eye” exclaimed the woman seated next to me. Daryl Hall did most of the monologue in between songs and mentioned how happy he was to be back in Los Angeles, to which the audience affectionately cooed. Outfitted in black leather jackets and mirrored lens sunglasses, the famed chart topping partners in crime stood side by side on matching carpets at the apron of the stage. On the menu this evening were some songs they “hadn’t done in a while” according to Hall. These rarities included tunes such as “Methods of Modern Love” and “Las Vegas Turnaround.” Concertgoers remained seated until “She’s Gone,” when the majority of the crowd rose to their feet to sing and dance along.

Daryl Hall

Daryl’s voice was clear and present and possessed a rugged “been there done that” quality. His phrasing differed from the studio recordings in a way that gave the lyrics a new perspective.

John Oates followed Hall’s lead vocals harmonizing effortlessly on every song. His voice sounded warm and rich as if it hadn’t aged a day. Throughout the show he maintained a quiet demeanor, smiling and waving to the audience but never directly speaking to them instead leaving those responsibilities to Hall.

John Oates

John Oates

The show was slightly marred by microphone feedback which was audible on more than one occasion. At its worst the squeaky feedback simultaneously matched a note played by a keyboard synthesizer which gave everyone at the venue a quick laugh. The band however proved to be able to outshine any of the minor quirks of the evening. The six musicians behind Daryl and John played exceptionally well and their solos were fresh and exciting. After a long jam session at the end of “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)” the band took a bow and left the stage.

But the audience wasn’t going anywhere, this much was certain. Just minutes later the duo and their band reappeared for the first of two encores and went on to play some of their biggest hits including “Rich Girl,” “You Make My Dreams,” “Kiss on My List” and finally ending the night with “Private Eyes.” Very attentive patrons would have also noticed that a pesky fan found her way onto the stage and made a beeline for John Oates during “Kiss on My List.” But all she managed to do was blow him a kiss before being escorted by security.

Hall & Oates

Hall & Oates

In the end, Daryl thanked the audience profusely for coming out and insisted that the fans “made it all possible.” He also mentioned his successful VH1/Palladia TV show “Live from Daryl’s House” and how that inspired him to open a new music venue called Daryl’s House in New York. The club is opening this weekend and Hall and Oates will christen it by playing the first show, which will be available on a free live stream on Yahoo music Friday night at 6. Although they are well into their 4th decade, Hall & Oates still seem to be in a world of limitless possibilities. They are two iconic musical pioneers who are still selling out large venues with ease. Sunday night’s show proved that their induction this year into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was well deserved. They have staying power and the audience CAN go for that!

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Photos by Bonnie Perkinson. 


Live Music: Experience Hendrix at the Greek Theatre

October 14, 2014

By Mike Finkelstein

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

Los Angeles, CA.  Of all the guitar players to come along in the 20th century, none have been more influential than Jimi Hendrix. Forty-four years after his death, his presence is still felt vividly by anyone with ears open. On Friday night, the Experience Hendrix tour 2014 vintage rolled into the Greek Theatre to share the love and appreciation for Jimi’s music and style. This tour featured hot-shot guitar players from all over the stylistic map, but culling mostly from blues, and rock ‘n roll … between which there is often a very thin line. You could say that Jimi Hendrix set up camp on this line and expanded his style into a very inspired original realm.

On Friday we had people like Zakk Wylde (from Ozzy Ozbourne’s band), Rich Robinson of the Black Crows, Jonny Lang, and Kenny Wayne Shepherd — all of whom were barely out of the crib or not yet born when Hendrix checked out — paying homage to him. Eric Johnson on the other hand was 16 by the time Hendrix died and had the time to take him in, way in, while he was current. Buddy Guy was actually an elder contemporary of Hendrix’s. And on Friday Jimi’s old Army buddy and Band of Gypsies mate Billy Cox, who helped arrange the tour, played on several tunes, including “Red House,” “Message to Love” and “Them Changes.”

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix

As a popular music artist, Jimi Hendrix brought the whole package to the table. He was legendarily influential in how electric guitars would sound and be played after him…and he played his Stratocaster left-handed and upside down! He also was an electrifying performer and an inspirational songwriter. The cherry atop it all was that Hendrix was an African American young man coming at the world, fusing Delta blues and rock ‘n’ roll, via swingin’ London, having blown away all the rock gods of the time away in their hometown. The world took notice. But these were turbulent times and copious drug use was absolutely the norm. By age 27, Jimi was a tragic casualty of the lifestyle, after only about 4 years in the limelight.

Yet, it appears that in many circles his legacy is still thriving. Then and now, he set the bar several dozen notches higher than it had been before, for anyone who was (or is) getting serious about playing rock guitar. If one can do justice to several of Hendrix’ tunes, then they just may be getting the real hang of the instrument.

There is one caveat about Hendrix’ music. It has seduced many guitar players into wanking out on their solos far too often, particularly on blues jams. Hendrix was such a great instrumentalist that he could pull off extended solos in a rock format when few others could. With his popularity and Eric Clapton’s concurrent years with Cream, many guitarists seized on stretching out and were nothing much more than boring.

Zack Wylde

Zack Wylde

When you have a night of people jamming Hendrix it’s a given that a whole lot of notes will be played for a long time. Generally speaking on Friday, only two guys went a little too long. They were Zakk Wylde (who looked like he’d clobber you like a cave man if you suggested as much) on “Manic Depression,” and Kenny Wayne Shepherd who did sound amazing as he went on and on over the soft and hard versions of “Voodoo Chile/Voodoo Child (Slight Return).” Wylde is a first string heavy metal dude. But, as deft a player as he is, his guitar style can get long winded and histrionic enough so as not to allow him to perhaps let it breathe the way blues-based music needs to. But he did add the elusive piano part to Eric Johnson’s version of “Are You Experienced?” that put it over into one of the top performances of the evening. Shepherd actually had an amazingly authentic tone to work with and did real justice to two of the litmus test tunes on the learning curve of rock guitar.

Eric Johnson and Scot Nelson

Eric Johnson and Scot Nelson

Friday’s show also did a fine job of spotlighting many of Hendrix’ most popular and most inspirational tunes. The song list was top shelf, with many of Jimi’s best deeper cuts and B-sides taking up the lion’s share of the program. “Stone Free,” “Manic Depression,” “Purple Haze” and “Little Wing” all made the list.

Ana Popovic

 

But so did a very soulful version, from Rich Robinson, of the bluesy but atypical “Up From the Skies,” Eric Johnson’s ripping version of “Ezy Rider,” Kenny Wayne Shepherd and singer Noah Hunt’s revved up version of “Gypsy Eyes,” a sparser, more poignant version of “House Burning Down,” from the lovely, guitar-slinging Ana Popovic, and a very tasty version of “Angel” from Doyle Bramhall II, which he has covered since he was in the Arc Angels.

Chris Layton and Doyle Bramhall II

It should be pointed out that the rhythm section was impeccable. Rock steady bassists Tony Franklin (The Firm, Whitesnake), who played fretless basses most of the night, and Scot Nelson were in fine form playing with the one and only Chris Layton. The laconic Layton was Stevie Ray Vaughn’s drummer for many memorable years and on Friday he made it look so easy to hold down the enormous bottom end of these songs – the calm in the middle of the storm.

Experience Hendrix featured one fine tune after another and it still leaves me incredulous that all of Jimi Hendrix’s music was produced in what amounts to about 4 short years. To say the least, he was taken away from the world far too early. Hendrix had some now legendary plans in the works to collaborate with Miles Davis and Emerson Lake and Palmer. What a shame it is that we never got to hear the sound of any of this.

But what he did put out remains stellar and it’s reaffirming to see that it still carries big weight with musical people. That’s why they come out to celebrate it at shows like this one.

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Photos of Doyle Bramhall II, Chris Layton, Ana Popovic, Eric Johnson and Scot Nelson by Mike Finkelstein.


Picks for a Long Weekend: Oct. 9 – 12 in Los Angeles, New York City and London

October 8, 2014

By Don Heckman

Sally Kellerman

Sally Kellerman

- Oct. 9. (Thurs.) Scott Snapp and Sally Kellerman. It’s an offbeat booking, with Snapp, who defines his singing/songwriting as Theatrical Pop, as the headliner, and Kellerman as “special guest.” But any appearance by Sally is stellar, and everything she sings deserves top billing. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. (310) 474-9400.

- Oct. 10. (Fri.) The Emerson String Quartet. Performing an all-Beethoven program of quartets from the early, late and middle stages of his remarkable works for string quartet. Segerstrom Center for the Arts.  (714) 556-2787.

- Oct. 10. (Fri.) The London Philharmonic Orchestra. Vladimir Jurowski conducts a program of Dvorak, Tchaikovsky and Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 with pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet. The Valley Performing Arts Center.  (818) 677-8800.

Maceo Parker

Maceo Parker

- Oct. 10 & 11. (Fri. & Sat.) Maceo Parker. Perhaps best known for his long association with James Brown and Parliament-Funkadelic, saxophonist Parker has also established himself as a major funk, soul and groove artist in his own right. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

- Oct. 11. (Sat.) Mary Chapin Carpenter. Country singer/songwriter Chapin has won five Grammy awards in a career studded with songs hitting the top of the country music charts. And with good reason, given the memorable quality of her work. Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. 6 (805) 449-2100.

- Oct. 12. (Sun.) Paula Poundstone, Lily Tomlin and guest MC Fred Willard. A rare evening of comedic pleasures, and with this line up expect the best. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

New York City

Chita Rivera

Chita Rivera

- Oct. 9 – 11. (Thurs.- Sun.) “Chita’s Back.Chita Rivera. The versatile artistry of Chita Rivera, from music to dance takes center stage. She doesn’t often make club appearances, so don’t miss this one. Birdland.  (212) 581-3080.

 

Lee Ritenour

Lee Ritenour

- Oct. 7 – 12. (Tues, – Sun.) Lee Ritenour. He used to be called “Captain Fingers” for his extraordinary technical virtuosity, But Ritenour has also added creative interpretations to his imaginative, swinging playing. The Blue Note. Residency. (212) 475-8592.

London

- Oct. 7 – 12. (Tues. – Sun.) Ronnie Scott’s. Stacey Kent. New Jersey-born jazz singer Kent has been living in the U.K. since the early ’90s, establishing herself as one of Europe’s finest jazz artists. Ronnie Scott’s +44 20 7439 0747.


Live Music: Crosby, Stills and Nash at the Greek Theatre

October 6, 2014

By Don Heckman

They were back again Friday and Saturday at the Greek Theatre. The incomparable Crosby, Stills & Nash. And once again they delivered a performance that will surely be recalled by the enthusiastic full house crowd as one of their most memorable experiences.

One could have made the same claim for their prior appearance at the Greek, two years ago, which was equally stunning. Not surprising, of course, given the music that C,S&N have to offer.

Stills, Nash and Crosby

This is not, however, a band that repeats itself – the way many holdover acts from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s do, presenting living jukebox renditions of their biggest hits. That’s not to say that C,S&N didn’t please the crowd’s appetite for material from the band’s songbook. But their hits, each of which shimmered with new musical facets, represented only one aspect of Friday night’s many musical pleasures.

The three hour program, including a twenty minute intermission, was liberally sprinkled with familiar C,S & N classics: “Carry On,” ”Southern Cross,” “Just A Song Before I Go,” “Delta,” “Deja Vu,” “Helplessly Hoping,” a climactic “Teach Your Children Well,” and a lot more.

David Crosby

David Crosby

When he wasn’t entertaining his listeners with his sardonic humor, David Crosby was applying his tactile vocal style to his atmospheric “Guinivere” and “Wooden Ships.”

Add to that Graham Nash’s irresistible love song, “Our House,” which immediately triggered warm hugging by seemingly every couple in the venue. And, in contrast, a rocking romp through Stephen Stills’ “Love the One You’re With,” which was quickly transformed into an audience singalong.

Stephen Stills

Stephen Stills

Further enhancing the program, Stills offered his unique interpretation of Bob Dylan’s “Girl From the North Country.” And a pair of new songs from Nash showed all the signs of eventually becoming new C,S&N classics. The first, “Here For You,” is an embracing love song. The second, “Burning For the Buddha,” is a stunning work, triggered by Nash’s response to the dozens of holy men in Tibet who have self-immolated since 2009 to protest China’s rule over areas of Tibet.

The program was delivered with collective and individual intensity, supported superbly by C,S&N’s back up band, which included Crosby’s son, keyboardist James Raymond.

Watching this seemingly non-stop flow of captivating music, I recalled the line that often was used in reference to James Brown, describing him as the “Hardest working man in show business,” and with good reason.

Graham Nash

Graham Nash

But in their Friday performance at the Greek, C,S&N were also worthy of the title during their more than 2 ½ hours on stage. Led by the dynamic presence of Graham Nash, who has clearly become the group’s spark plug, the trio’s performance was a non-stop whirlwind of activity.

Each member of the trio offered a characteristic number, some original, some not, displaying their stellar individual skills. In the ensemble vocal passages, they demonstrated their ability to produce the harmonically rich, tonally lush characteristics of their vocal togetherness.

And in the hard driving, rhythmically intense pieces, led by the soaring electric lead guitar of Stills, they reminded us of the rock roots that lie deep within the foundation of this superb trio of great pop artists.

In my review of C,S&N’s 2012 Greek Theatre appearance, I wrote that “the words of “Déjà Vu” remind us that ‘We have all been here before.’ Let’s hope that Crosby, Stills & Nash continue to be here again.”

And now, after hearing them again this year, let’s hope that we can continue to experience deja vu all over, and hear C,S&N again, and again.

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Photos by photo journalist Bonnie Perkinson.


Picks of the Weekend in L.A.: October 3 – 5.

October 3, 2014

By Don Heckman

It’s a light weekend, as Yom Kippur ushers in October. But there are some intriguing musical events to experience. Like these:

Angelique Kidjo

- Oct. 3. (Fri.) Angelique Kidjo, With special guest Red Baraat, Dynamic, exciting and entertaining only begin to describe Angelique Kidjo’s remarkable performances. And this one includes the added high energies of the Brooklyn bhangra band with percussionist Sunny Jain. Valley Performing Arts Center.  2014-10-03 (818) 677-8800.

- Oct. 3 & 4. (Fri. & Sat.) Crosby, Stills & Nash. What is there to say that hasn’t been said about the remarkable musical history, past and present, of the extraordinary musical collecetive of David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. Here they are in their always welcome, annual Southland appearance. The Greek Theatre.  (323) 665-5857.

– Oct.4. (Sat,.) Sha Na Na sings Grease. It’s a great combination: the doo-wop songsters of Sha Na Na take on the hit songs from the hit film musical Grease. Expect to hear “Hound Dog,” “Rock ‘n’ Roll Is Here To Stay,” “Sandy” and more. Don’t miss this one. Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.  (562) 916-8500

Jennifer Leitham

Jennifer Leitham

- Oct. 4. (Sat.) Jennifer Leitham. It’s unclear why Upstairs at Vitello’s continues to describe itself as a “Jazz and Supper Club.”: No argument with the “Supper,” which is good enough; but “Jazz” has become virtually non-existent in a room that once seemed on the way to establishing itself as one of the Southland’s prime jazz destinations. Fortunately there are still rare, but worthwhile, jazz nights at Vitello’s (a few times a month) with appearances by performers such as Jennifer Leitham, who brings jazz authenticity to whatever and wherever she’s playing. Upstairs at Vitello’s.  (818) 769-0905.

Mark Winkler and Cheryl Bentyne

Oct. 5. (Sun.) A Tribute to Myrna Daniels and the L.A. Jazz Scene Newspaper. Here’s one of the jazz events of the Fall season. Start out with an 11:00 a.m. brunch tribute to the many contributions Myrna Daniels and her L.A. Jazz Scene have made to the continuing presence of jazz in the Southland. Following that, there’ll be performances by Chambers, Herbert & Ellis, Mon David, Jackie Gibson, Dolores Scozzesi, Cathy Segal-Garcia, Judy Wexler, Cat Connor, Lauren White, Mark Winkler & Cheryl Bentyne and others. Later, on Sunday night, Ron Jones and his hard-swinging Influence Jazz Orchestra will top off a music-filled day and night. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

- Oct. 5. (Sun.) Michelle Coltrane and Shea Welsh. Like her brother Ravi, singer Michelle Coltrane has inherited a remarkable legacy from her parents, John and Alice Coltrane. Also like her brother, she’s applied that legacy to her own growing musical creativity. She performs here with her close musical associate, busy studio guitarist Welsh. Should be a fascinating musical evening. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

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Mark Winkler and Cheryl Bentyne photo by Faith Frenz.


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