Live Music: Lynda Carter at Catalina Bar & Grill

April 15, 2014

By Don Heckman

Hollywood, CA.  A full house doesn’t completely describe the crowd that was virtually overflowing the room at Catalina Bar & Grill Saturday night. But it wasn’t surprising, given the fact that the headliner was Lynda Carter. And that was exciting news for anyone who was a television fan back in the seventies.

Why? Because Lynda Carter was Wonder Woman. Add to that, she also won the Miss World USA Pageant in 1972 and appeared in numerous television specials, as well.

Lynda Carter

Lynda Carter

Carter did not, of course, take the stage at Catalina’s wearing her Wonder Woman costume. (Although it would have pleased a substantial number of fans – especially males – if she had.) But the truth is that many in the full house crowd seemed pleased to see and hear Lynda Carter the singer, rather than Lynda Carter, Wonder Woman.

And with good reason. Although she continues to draw value out of her past Wonder Woman identity, Carter has become a world class performer who moves with impressive musicality through genres reaching from pop and r&b to country music.

Lynda Carter and her band

Lynda Carter and her band

Backed by a stellar band and an equally skilled group of back up singers, she was also a convincing entertainer. Gracing the stage with her lithe movements, communicating warmly with her listeners between numbers, she convincingly affirmed performing skills that reached well beyond her role as a superhero.

Lynda Carter and her back up singers

Lynda Carter and her back up singers

Carter’s program underscored the range of her many abilities. Among the richly varied tunes she included The Black Peas’s “Lonely Boy,” a new Sam Cooke song, Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire” and Christina Aguilera’s “Candy Man.”

Lynda Carter

Lynda Carter

Add to that such familiar items as “I Heard It Through The Grapevine,” “Fever,” and “God Bless The Child,” capping her show with “Let the Good Times Roll.”

Carter and her fine musicians and singers handled the varied styles with an ease that generated enthusiastic audience responses all the way to the final encore.

No, it wasn’t Wonder Woman. But when Lynda Carter stepped to the microphone, it was all music, and memorable music at that.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.


Live Jazz: Ariana Savalas at Herb Alpert’s Vibrato Grill, Jazz…etc.

April 11, 2014

By Don Heckman

Bel Air, CA. Ariana Savalas. The name may have a familiar ring to it. Especially the surname “Savalas” which will be familiar to most fans of television and movies. And especially familiar when a first name is also included, adding up to “Telly Savalas,” the late actor best known for playing the title role in the ’70s crime drama Kojak and numerous villains in dozens of films.

Ariana Savalas

Ariana Savalas

Ariana Savalas is Telly Savalas’ daughter (the youngest of six siblings), and a rapidly emerging actress and musical star in her own right. Her performance at Vibrato on Thursday night – one of her too rare appearances in the Southland – was an impressive display of her creative skills. Not only is Ariana a musical artist who delivered her songs with the gripping qualities of a born musical story-teller. She also engaged her audiences between songs with a warm blend of wit and humor.

Backed by the stellar ensemble of Joe Bagg, Andy Senasi and Steve Venz, Ariana made the most of a program of songs reaching from standards to her own originals. Kicking off her set with the Yiddish classic, “Bei Mir Bistu Shein,” she opened with a dynamic interpretation, clearly pleasing the overflow crowd.

Ariana Savalas and her band

Ariana Savalas and her band

Ariana followed with one appealing standard after another: “You and the Night and the Music,” “I Get A Kick Out of You,” “I See Your Face Before Me,” “They Can’t Take That Away From Me,” “Sophisticated Lady,” “Making Whoopie” and more. Each was interpreted with her unique creative view.

Corky Hale

Corky Hale

Some of the additional intriguing moments of the evening took place when veteran singer/pianist/harpist Corky Hale – who has been an avid supporter of Ariana’s rising star – moved from her seat in the audience on stage to the piano bench. Backing Ariana’s intimate renderings of several tunes, Corky also added a brief but appealing vocal interpretation of her own.

Ariana followed with an expanded display of her versatility, singing several of her original songs, as well as  the intriguing “Mechanical Man,” and accompanying herself on both piano and ukulele.

Ariana Savalas

Ariana Savalas

No wonder the restless audience insisted upon warming up in the glow of Ariana Savalas’ musical artistry, asking for as many encores as she would provide. The result was another of the many nights to remember at Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. Let’s hope that, in future weeks and months, there’ll be more frequent performances by this gifted young talent.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz. 

 


Photo Review: Bianca Rossini at Vibrato Grill Jazz etc…

April 6, 2014

By Don Heckman

Photos By Faith Frenz

Bel Air, CA. Bianca Rossini brought a colorful touch of Brazil to Vibrato Grill Jazz..etc. Thursday night. The busy actress/singer/songwriter and author makes rare live performances. But when she does, they showcase all of her many skills, enlivened by the rich, emotional Brazilian roots that are at the heart of her art.

Most of her selections, chosen from Rossini’s growing collection of original songs, were sung with the solid backing of keyboardist Yuko Tamura, guitarist Capital Violao Guitarra, bassist Sezin Ahmet Turkmenoglu and drummer Aaron Rafael Serfaty.

The songs covered everything from captivating bossa novas to ballads and rhythm tunes. Understandably, the often uneven aspects of the material reflected the fact that Rossini works with a range of writing partners. But it was her dark-toned voice and dramatic presentation that brought all the music together into one engaging interpretation after another.

Since Rossini’s performance was so visually oriented, emphasizing her lithe and expressive skills as a dancer and actress, it seemed appropriate to call in our stellar photographer, Faith Frenz, to provide a colorful photo essay of Bianca Rossini in action.

Bianca Rossini and her band

Bianca Rossini and her band

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Live Music: Steve Tyrell at Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.

March 29, 2014

By Don Heckman

Bel Air.  Mention an area of the music world and Steve Tyrell has been there and done that. Whether it’s from a business perspective, running a record company or producing albums by major artists, or if it’s in the creative arena, clearly establishing his own identity as a performer Tyrell knows how to do it.

On Wednesday night at Herb Alpert’s Bel Air club – Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. – Tyrell displayed the vocal artistry he has developed as a master interpreter of the Great American Songbook.

The Songbook, of course, with its extraordinary collection of works reaching from Gershwin, Berlin, Porter, Kern and beyond, has been the foundation for the careers of numerous singers. But Tyrell’s far-reaching interpretive skills have brought new perspectives to this rich catalog of material.

Performing with the skillful backing of a stellar band of players, Tyrell was at his best.

Steve Tyrell and his Band at Vibrato Grill Jazz...etc.

Steve Tyrell and his Band at Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.

Among the rich list of songs he sang, every selection was memorable. Starting with “I’ll Take Romance,” “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” and “They Can’t Take That Away From Me,” he proceeded with classics such as “I Can’t Get Started,” “I Get A Kick Out of You” “Come Rain Or Come Shine,” “This Guy’s In Love With You” and a climactic “Stand By Me.”

He introduced most of the songs with a few insightful comments about the songwriters. On some, he often included the usually omitted verses of the songs. And he frequently added fascinating anecdotes providing intriguing insight into a song’s history.

Steve Tyrell

Steve Tyrell

But the real evaluation of Tyrell’s performance has to mention what he brought to both the music and the lyrics of every song he sang. Tyrell is often praised for the appeal of his warm, Texas accent, brisk rhythmic swing and easygoing on stage manner.

Add to that, however, his innate skills as a musical story teller. In song after song, he blended his jazz-driven phrasing with a thoughtful interpretive ability. The result was the opportunity to experience a musical poet in action, finding the most gripping lyrical moments in every song he touched.

So call it an evening showcasing the best of American song, rendered with complete creative authenticity. And listening to Steve Tyrell’s performance one couldn’t help but imagine how delighted the legion of American Songbook composers might have been to hear their musical brilliance evoked with such care and enthusiasm.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.

 

 


Live Music: Blood, Sweat & Tears at the Saban Theatre.

March 23, 2014

By Don Heckman

Beverly Hills. They’re back. That’s right. Blood, Sweat & Tears, one of American popular music’s great iconic ensembles of the ’60s, ’70s and beyond.

After decades of uncertainty about B,S&T’s future, the new millenium did not initially appear to offer high visibility for a band who, in the late ’60s and early ’70s, was one of the most popular, best selling musical acts in the world.

Bobby Colomby

Bobby Colomby

Enter Bobby Colomby. As one of the original founders of Blood, Sweat & Tears, as well as the band’s drummer and producer in its early, high visibility years, he felt that it was time for the New Blood, Sweat & Tears to make an appearance. And, last Saturday night at the Saban Theatre in Beverly Hills, Colomby introduced Los Angelenos to a brand new version of the band designed to play a visible and vital role in the 21st century.

“We’re not trying to target just one generation,” says Colomby.,. “That would be a mistake. With this updated version, I want to gain a wider audience. I want people of all ages to come and say, ‘Next time I’m bringing more friends to the show; they gotta see this band.”

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Blood, Sweat & Tears

And that’s pretty much what Colomby and the gifted players of the New Blood Sweat & Tears offered in their Saturday night show.

Most pop music acts who have reached beyond their prime years often depend completely upon their greatest hits, or similarly crafted material, to carry them through a performance. Which is not surprising. But Colomby’s wide pop music experience and creative devotion to the band he founded have always led him to more imaginative ambitions.

“We’re not just looking for songs that sound like they’d be good for Blood, Sweat & Tears,” he says, “but looking for really great songs. Period. The original B,S&T,” he continues, “was designed to introduce jazz elements to pop music. That was my passion… it still is. Always, of course, done in an entertaining way.”

And there was no lack of Colomby’s view of the band’s entertainment capacity in their high energy Saturday night performance at the Saban Theatre. And it was especially valuable as an opportunity for the overflow crowd to meet the stellar instrumental sound richly reminiscent of B,S &T’s most memorable jazz big band qualities.

The band, man for man, pound for pound, is better than the original B, S & T.,” says Colomby. “Without a doubt.They’re a ridiculously talented bunch,The drummer’s better than I am, or was.”

Bo Bice

Bo Bice

Equally important, maybe even more so, new lead singer Bo Bice provided captivating performances, calling up images of David Clayton-Thomas’s B,S &T’s hard driving vocals at their best. No one can really top David C-T, but Colomby’s discovery of Bice’s impressive singing added the final touch that the new Blood, Sweat and Tears needed to establish its relevance as a pop music act with a potential similar to the successes of the band’s ’60s and ’70s’ accomplishments.

So let’s call the band’s Saturday night performance a captivating introduction to a band that combines the memory of a brilliant musical past with a wide open potential for a brand new future.

Don’t forget the name: Blood, Sweat & Tears.

* * * * * * * *

Full Disclosure: For what it’s worth as a reference point, I co-produced the last big Blood, Sweat & Tears album, “B,S&T 4” with Bobby Colomby and engineer Roy Halee.


Picks of the Week: March 5 – 9

March 5, 2014

By Don Heckman

 Los Angeles

Betty Bryant

Betty Bryant

- March 6. (Thurs.) Betty Bryant. Singer/pianist Bryant’s engaging style recalls an era of briskly swinging, warmly interpretive jazz cabaret. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Savion Glover

Savion Glover

- March 7. (Fri.) Savion Glover’s StePz. Tap dancer Glover has brought more jazz qualities to contemporary tap dancing than anyone since Fred Astaire. Valley Performing Arts Center. (818) 677-3000.

- Mar. 7 & 8. (Fri. & Sat.) West Side Story. The Leonard Bernstein/Stephen Sondheim classic musical rendering of the Romeo and Juliet story in a Nuyorican setting is a memorable theatre piece that should be seen by everyone – at least once or more. The Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.  (562) 916-8500.

Les Ballets De Monte Carlo

Les Ballets De Monte Carlo

- March 7 – 9. (Fri. – Sun.) Les Ballets de Monte Carlo. The highly praised Monte Carlo ensemble returns to Segerstrom after their acclaimed 2011 debut. This time, they perform Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake. Segerstrom Center for the Arts.  (714) 556-2787.

- March 8. (Sat.) “The Marvelous Music Box.” Young Musicians Foundation 59th Benefit Gala. Some of the Southland’s finest young classical musicians assemble for a benefit program featuring the music of Bach, Saint-Saens, Bernstein, Stravinsky and more. CAP UCLA at Royce Hall. .  (310) 825-4401.

Gerald Wilson

- March 9. (Sun.) Gerald Wilson Big Band. At 95, arranger/composer/bandleader brings irresistible musical vitality to every performance with his hard swinging big band. Catalina Bar & Grill (223) 466-2210.

- March 9. (Sun.) Fred Hersch and Julian Lage. Innovative jazz pianist Hersch, always in search of new creative ventures, finds an intriguing young musical partner in highly praised young guitarist Lage. Schoenberg Hall. A CAP UCLA event.  (310) 825-4401.

San Francisco

- March 6 – 9. (Thurs. – Sun.) Lavay Smith. Bay area songstress Smith offers a four night survey of songs associated with Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Etta James and Sarah Vaughan. An SFJAZZ event at the Joe Henderson Lab.  (866) 920-5299.

Seattle

- March 6 – 9 . (Thurs. – Sun.) Sergio Mendes and Brazil 2014. Half a century after he arrived on the music scene with Brazil ’66, Mendes reforms the vocal/instrumental Brazilian format that first brought Brazilian sambas and bossa novas to an international audience. Jazz Alley.  (206) 441-9729.

- March 6 – 9. (Thurs. – Sun.) Lee Ritenour. Versatile guitarist Ritenour showcases his articulate ease with jazz genres reaching from straight ahead swing to contemporary grooves. Blues Alley.  (202) 337-4141.

New York City

Eliane Elias

- March 5 – 9. (Wed. – Sun.) Eliane Elias and her Trio. After a four night run drawing overflow audiences to Catalina Bar & Grill, Brazil-born Elias takes her irresistibly appealing piano stylings and intimate vocalizing to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola.   (212) 258-9595.  To read an earlier iRoM review of Elias’ L.A. Performance, click HERE.

- March 6 & 7. (Thurs. & Fri.) Jimmy Webb. Singer/songwriter Webb is understandably on everyone’s Hall of Fame list. Songs such as “Wichita Line Man,” “By the Time I Get To Phoenix” and “MacArthur Park” (to name only a few) have become Songbook Classics. Here’s a rare chance to hear him perform in a club setting. Iridium. (212) 582-2121.

London

- March 5 & 6. (Wed. & Thurs.) Claire Martin. Alert fans of jazz singing view Martin (with good reason) as one of England’s finest jazz artists. Ronnie Scott’s+44 (0)20 7439 0747.

Copenhagen

Benny Green

- March 5 & 6. (Wed. & Thurs.) Benny Green Trio. The fast-fingered, hard-swinging Oscar Peterson style is vividly alive in the technically adept, improvisationally inventive hands of Green. Jazzhus Montmartre.  +45 31 72 34 94.

Moscow

- March 5. (Wed.) Igor Butman Quartet. Saxophonist/band leader/club owner Butman takes a break from his big band to lead a propulsively hard driving quartet in his own club. Igor Butman Jazz Club.  (+7 495) 632-92-64.

Milan

- Mar 5 – 7. (Wed. – Fri.) Paolo Fresu Quintet. Highly regarded jazz trumpeter Fresu leads a quintet of stellar players, underscoring the lyrical qualities Italian artists have always brought to their jazz interpretations. +39 02 6901 6888.  Blue Note Milano. 

* * * * * * * *

Eliane Elias photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

Benny Green photo by Ron Hudson.


Picks of the Week: Feb. 18 – 23

February 18, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

Brenna Whitaker

- Feb. 19. (Wed.) Brenna Whitaker. She’s a blonde beauty with a voice to remember. Michael Buble has called Whitaker “one of the finest singers of our generation. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- Feb. 20 – 23. (Thurs. – Sun.) ”TchaikovskyFest.” The Los Angeles Philharmonic celebrates Tchaikovsky with performances of his chamber music, as well as his Symphonies #1 and #6. Disney Hall.  (323) 850-2000.

Steve Tyrell

Steve Tyrell

- Feb. 20 – 23. (Thurs, – Sun.) Steve Tyrell. He’s back at Catalina’s again for another long weekend. So don’t miss this opportunity to experience Tyrell’s warm, interpretive, gently swinging way with the Great American Songbook. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

- Feb. 22. (Sat.) Bob McChesney Quartet. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. (310) 474-9400. The Southland bandleaders’ first choice for their trombone section. McChesney is not just a master of his instrument, he also brings rich musical depths to everything he plays. Here, he’s out front, leading his own band. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- Feb. 23. (Sun.) Angela Parrish. Singer, songwriter and pianist Parrish showcases her engaging collection of original songs. Vitello’s. (818) 769-0905.

- Feb. 23. (Sun.) “Guitar Passions.,” Call this a great evening of guitar mastery in a variety of appealing styles. Start with the classical guitar of Sharon Isbin, followed by her guests – Brazilian guitarist Romero Lubambo and the finger tapping stylings of Stanley Jordan. Valley Performing Arts Center.  (818) 677-8800.

San Francisco

Bobby Hutcherson

Bobby Hutcherson

- Feb. 20 – 23. (Thurs. – Sun.) Bobby Hutcherson, David Sanborn, Joey DeFrancesco and Billy Hart join forces in an assemblage of jazz all-stars. An SFJAZZ event at Miner Auditorium.  (866) 920-5299.

Portland OR

- Feb. 23 (Sun.) Dave Frishberg and Bob Dorough. “Who’s On First?” A rare opportunity to hear a tandem performance by a pair of the jazz world’s most gifted musical humorists. A PDX Jazz Event at the Winningstad Theatre.  (503) 228-5299.

New York City

- Feb. 20 (Thurs.) Portraits of Joni: Jessica Molaskey Sings Joni Mitchell. Musical theatre star Molaskey (and wife of John Pizzarelli) takes a break from the stage to explore the rich Mitchell song catalog. Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola.  (212) 258-9595.

- Feb. 21 – 23. (Fri. – Sun.) Patricia Barber. Singer/pianist brings imagination, musicality and wit to her new interpretations of Songbook classics, as well as her own songs.The Blue Note.  (212) 475-8592.

Milan

Dee Dee Bridgewater

Dee Dee Bridgewater

- Feb. 19 – 22. (Wed. – Sat.) Dee Dee Bridgewater. The one and only Dee Dee offers her inimitable collection of vocal jazz renderings to Italy’s many jazz fans. Blue Note Milano.  +39 02 6901 6888.

Moscow

- Feb. 23. (Sun.) Lisa Henry. With the Igor Butman Trio. Blues and gospel specialist Henry is backed by saxophonist/bandleader and club owner Igor Butman. Igor Butman Jazz Club.  (+7 495) 632-92-64.

Warsaw

- Feb. 22. (Sat.) DISCO FEVER! Revisit the dance crazes of the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s in a Polish evening to remember. Tygmont Live Club.  +48 22 828 34 09.

Tokyo

Roy Hargrove

Roy Hargrove

- Feb. 18 & 19. (Tues. & Wed.) Roy Hargrove Big Band. Trumpeter Hargrove continues his quest to keep big band jazz alive with his own stellar ensemble. Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.


Picks of the Weekend: Jan. 30 – Feb. 2

January 30, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

Stanley Clarke

Stanley Clarke

- Jan. 30 – Feb. 1 (Thurs. – Sat.) Stanley Clarke Trio and the Harlem Quartet. Eclectic bassist and band leader Clarke blends his always-fascinating trio work with the unique sounds of the Harlem
Quartet. Catalina Bar & Grill (223) 466-2210.

- Jan. 30. (Thurs. Lauren Kinhan. A CD Release party for a young singer with a voice to remember. Vitello’s (818) 769-0905.

- Jan. 31. (Fri.) Billy Childs Electric Band. Pianist/composer Childs’ versatility runs the complete gamut of jazz genres. This time out, it’s all electric. The Blue Whale.  (213) 620-0908.

Hilary Hahn

Hilary Hahn

- Jan. 31. (Fri.) Hilary Hahn and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Russian conductor Andrey Boreyko leads violinist Hahn and the L.A. Phil in a program of Nordic music by Sibelius, Nielsen and Swedish composer Anders Hillborg. Disney Hall.  (323) 850-2000.

- Jan. 31. (Fri.) Gina Saputo. A rising star if there ever was one, Saputo’s vocals are the product of a compelling young talent. Steamer’s.  (714) 871-8800.

Gary Foster

Gary Foster

- Feb. 1. (Sat.) Gary Foster Quartet. Saxophonist Foster has been one of L.A.’s prime first call players for years. Here, he’s in action fronting his own band. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc (310) 474-9400.

- Feb. 2. (Sun.) The Webb All-Stars. All-Stars is an appropriate title for a band featuring Doug Webb, saxophones, Mitch Forman, keyboards, John Ziegler, guitar, Jimmy Earl, bass, Danny Carey, drums. The Baked Potato.  (818) 980-1615.

Seattle

Bill Frisell

Bill Frisell

- Jan. 30 – Feb. 2. (Thurs. – Sun.) Bill Frisell’s “Guitar in the Space Age.” Always on the crest of trying something new, Frisell’s latest effort features Greg Leisz, Tony Scherr and Kenny Wollesen. Jazz Alley,  (206) 441-9729.

Washington D.C.

- Jan. 29. (Wed.) Diane Marino. The warm and engaging voice of singer Marino offers a performance celebrating the relese of her latest CD, Loads of Love. Blues Alley.  (202) 337-4141.

New York City

John Abercrombie

John Abercrombie

- – Jan. 30 – Feb. 1. (Thurs. – Sat.) John Abercrombie Quartet. Guitarist Ambercrombie does a convincing job of blending fun, fusion and straight ahead bebop. The Jazz Standard.  (212) 447-7733.

Copenhagen

- Jan. 30 – 31. (Thurs & Fri.) Dado Moroni: “The Legacy of John Coltrane.” An international all-star jazz ensemble commemmorates the incomparable music of the great John Coltrane. Featuring pianist Moroni from Italy, vibist Joe Locke from the U.S., tenor saxophonist Max Ionata and bassist Marco Panascia from Italy, and drummer Morten Lund from Denmark. Jazzhus Montmartre.  +45 31 72 34 94.

Milano

Billy Cobham

Billy Cobham

= Jan. 30 – Feb. 1. (Thurs. – Sat.) Billy Cobham Spectrum 40. Drummer Cobham’s crisply rhythmic Spectrum features the guitar work of Dean Brown, the keyboards of Gary Husband and the bass of Ric Fierabracci. Blue Note Milano.  +39 02 6901 6888.


Live Jazz: Janis Siegel at Vitello’s

January 17, 2014

By Don Heckman

Studio City, CA. Taking a break from her full time job with the Manhattan Transfer, Janis Siegel made one of her rare solo appearances Tuesday night before a full house crowd at Vitello’s. And the result was an extraordinary display of her irresistibly appealing musicality. By the time her performance had wound to a close, she had delivered a set of far-ranging songs demanding an array of unique interpretive skills.

Janis Siegel

Janis Siegel

Given the demands of singing the Transfer’s rich repertoire, it’s no surprise that Siegel chose a diverse program of works that would have challenged any singer. But the key point was not what she did, but how she did it.

Among the numerous highlights in a performance superbly backed by the stellar trio of pianist John Di Martino, bassist Boris Koslov and drummer Steve Haas:

- A gorgeously expressive reading of Billy Strayhorn’s classic “A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing.

- The sophisticated musical pleasures of Ann Hampton Callaway’s original tune, “Slow.”

- Antonio Carlos Jobim’s memorable bossa nova,” Inutil Paisagem” (“Useless Landscape,”) with bassist Koslov managing to produce guitar-like bossa rhythms on his instrument.

- A number that was introduced by Siegel as a “Bach Improvisation.” And it began with Siegel scatting a convincingly Baroque-sounding set of inventions that were soon transformed into Clifford Brown’s “Joy Spring.”

- Fred Hersch’s lovely ballad, “Endless Stars,” sung with captivatingly intimate lyricism.

- A delightfully rhythmic romp through “Minnie the Moocher.”

And there was more: a Cuban bolero; a song written by Siegel and David Sanborn; and a Norwegian song about imperfection.

Add to that the presence of a pair of impressive guest artists. First, the songwriter/producer Leon Ware came out of the audience to share a duet on “A Whole Lotta Man.”

Janis Siegel and TIerney Sutton

Janis Siegel and TIerney Sutton

But the second guest artist, singer Tierney Sutton, got together with Siegel for one of the major highlights of this, or any other, night at Vitello’s. They only sang a single number – “You Don’t Know What Love Is” – but it was a spontaneous, duet performance, filled with stunning, interactive passages that will surely be remembered by every enthusiastic member of the audience.

In my reviews of a pair of Siegel appearances that took place over the past couple of years, I wrapped both with an expression of my desire to hear her more frequently in a solo setting reaching beyond her stunning work with the Transfer. So, too, for this review. And I’ll wind it up with more hope that Siegel will gift her many fans with more frequent opportunities to hear her in solo action.

 * * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.


Picks of the Week: Dec. 26 – 29

December 26, 2013

By Don Heckman

The week between Christmas and New Year’s is always light on performances. And this week is no exception. But numerous events, nonetheless, are well worthy of listeners’ attention. Here’s a selective group of some of the many highlights.

Los Angeles

Robert Davi

Robert Davi

- Dec. 26. (Thurs.) Robert Davi. Actor/singer Davi has thoroughly established himself as a Sinatra-inspired vocalist, when he isn’t building an impressive career as a film actor, as well. But he’s also a gifted singer who has created an engaging style of his own. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- Dec. 26. (Thurs.) Vocalist Peggie Perkins, a Los Angeles jazz favorite for decades, performs with the Llew Matthews Quartet, featuring tenor saxophonist Rickey Woodard, bassist John B Williams, guitarist Doug MacDonald and drummer Jimmy Ford. Vitello’s.  (818) 769-0905

- Dec. 27. (Fri.) The Midnight Jazz Band. A quartet of veteran jazz all-stars, Gary Foster, alto saxophone, Tom Ranier, piano, Chuck Berghofer, bass and Peter Erskine, drums have been among the Southland musical aristocracy for decades. Vitello’s.  (818) 769-0905.

- Dec, 27 & 28. (Fri. & Sat. ) Broadway on Ice. An impressive holiday presentation, featuring a dynamic creative partnership between Olympic Gold Medalist skater Ekaterina Gordeeva and Broadway singing star Davis Gaines. Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.  (562) 916-8510.

Jane Monheit

Jane Monheit

 - Dec. 27 – 31. (Fri. – Tues.) Jane Monheit. Celebrating the 10th anniversary of her recording career, Monheit has thoroughly established herself as a uniquely gifted jazz artist with deep roots in the Great American Songbook. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

 Washington, D.C.

- Dec. 27 – 31. (Fri. – Tues.) Monty Alexander. Jamaica’s Alexander, a prime jazz artist, enlivens much of his music with the appealing rhythms of the Caribbean. Blues Alley.  (202) 337-414.

New York City

Michael Feinstein

Michael Feinstein

- Dec. 26 – 28. (Thurs. – Sat.) Michael Feinstein. The master of the Great American songbook, singer/pianist Feinstein is also a superb entertainer, leading his audiences through the expressive intimacies of every song he offers. Birdland.  (212) 581-3080.

- Dec. 26 – 29. (Thurs. – Sun.) Carmen Lundy. Vocalist Lundy has a full range of creative skills, a rare example of a jazz singer who is also a gifted songwriter. Catch her in action. The Jazz Standard.  (212) 576-2232.

.

Chris Botti

- Dec. 26 – Jan. 5. (Thurs. – Sun.) Chris Botti. Trumpeter Botti, a stellar performer in his own right, leads an equally world class jazz ensemble in an extended holiday run. Expect to hear some extraordinary music. The Blue Note. (212) 475-8592.

Milan

- Dec. 26 – 31. Angels in Harlem Gospel Choir. The touring ensemble of the Harlem Gospel Choir, one of the world’s most prominent gospel groups, the Angels offer a special blend of high spirited gospel music at its finest. Blue Note Milano.  +39 02 6901 6888.

Tokyo

.

Hiromi

.-

Dec. 28 – 31. (Sat. – Tues.) Hiromi Trio Project. The highly imaginative keyboardist returns to her home country in the company of bassist Anthony Jackson and drummer Simon Phillips. Blue Note Tokyo.  03 5485 0088.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 209 other followers