Picks of the Week: July 29 – Aug. 3 in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington D.C., New York City, London, Paris and Tokyo

July 29, 2014

By Don Heckman

It’s another hot week, with a lot of venues still in the midst of their Summer hiatuses.  But there’s still some fine, selective music to hear.

Los Angeles

Amanda McBroom

Amanda McBroom

- July 29. (Tues.) Amanda McBroom and George Ball. Musical theatre and cabaret star Amanda McBroom and actor/singer George Ball present a program of classic songs. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

- July 30. (Wed.) Lola Haag, Mark Massey and Friends. The sultry voice of Lola Haag is backed by the jazz piano stylings of Mark Massey and his stellar group. Steamers7.  (714) 871-8800.

- July 31. (Thurs.) Chuck Manning & Steve Huffsteter Quartet. A pair of Los Angeles’ world class jazz artists – saxophonist Manning and trumpeter  Huffsteter take a break from their busy bookings as sidemen to step into the spotlight.  They perform in a piano-less quartet with bassist Pat Senatore and drummer Matt GordyVibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- Aug. 1 – 3. (Fri. – Sun.) “Hair.”  The classic rock musical of the sixties takes over the Bowl for a rare three night run. A must-see for all boomers. Hollywood Bowl.  (323) 850-2000.

Strunz and Farah

Strunz and Farah

- Aug. 2. (Sat.) Strunz & Farah. The dynamic guitar duo of Costa Rica’s Jorge Strunz and Iran’s Ardeshir Farah are back, making a second L.A. appearance in the past two weeks. Don’t miss them. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

San Francisco

(July 31 – Aug. 3.(Thurs. – Sun.) Vinicius Cantuaria Sings Jobim. Guitarist/singer Canturia, one of bossa nova’s most authentic interpreters, illuminates the Antonio Carlos Jobim catalog of songs. SFJAZZ event at Joe Henderson Lab.  (866) 920-5299.

Washington D.C.

Melba Moore

Melba Moore

- Aug. 1 & 2. (Friday & Sat.) Melba Moore. Grammy-nominated, Tony-Award winning r&b, soul, and blues singer Moore is a master of contemporary pop music styles with hits reaching back to the ’70s. Blues Alley.  (202) 337-4141.

 New York City

- July 31 – Aug. 3. (Thurs. – Sun.) The legendary Count Basie Orchestra. The irresistible rhythms and big band classics of the Count Basie Orchestra live on, with trumpeter Scotty Barnhart leading the way. The Blue Note.  (212) 475-8592.

London

- July 28 – Aug. 2 (Mon. – Sat.) The Average White Band. Four decades after their hit-making years of the ’70s and ’80s, the Scottish Average White Band is still playing their soul, r&b and funk classics. Two original members – Alan Gorrie and Onnie McIntyre – are still present, along with three new members from the U.S. Ronnie Scott’s.  +44 (0)20 7439 0747.

Paris

Roy Hargrove

Roy Hargrove

Aug. 1 ;& 2. (Fri. & Sat.) The Roy Hargrove Quintet. Versatile trumpeter Hargrove steps away from his big band to lead a swinging quintet of jazz stars. Paris New Morning.  +33 1 45 23 51 41.

Tokyo

- July 29.  ( Tues.)  The Preservation Hall Jazz Band.  The classic sounds of New Orleans jazz are alive and well in the swinging playing of the preservation Hall Jazz Band.  The Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.

 


Live Jazz: The Ron Carter Trio at Catalina Bar & Grill.

July 26, 2014

By Don Heckman

There was good news for jazz Friday night at Catalina Bar & Grill.

Good news because the Sunset Blvd. Jazz club – L.A.’s principal destination for world class jazz groups – was packed.

Good news because the enthusiastic crowd seemed captivated by the music.

And, best of all, good news because the headlining act – the Ron Carter Trio – played a set that was a virtual definition of jazz at its finest.

The Ron Carter Trio: Donald Vega, Ron Carter and Russell Malone

The Ron Carter Trio: Donald Vega, Ron Carter and Russell Malone

The Trio’s instrumentation – Carter playing bass, Donald Vega playing piano, and Russell Malone playing guitar – was a stunning example of jazz minimalism: no drummer, no horns. And they handled it brilliantly.

Ron Carter

Ron Carter

The atmosphere on stage was a blend of jam session spontaneity with the subtle but complex interplay of a classical chamber ensemble. Collective passages seemed both organized and off the cuff. Solo passages flowed imaginatively through open spaces in the ensemble, allowing each player to reach into his deepest well of creativity.

Carter made a few soft-voiced comments between selections. But, for the most part, the music unfolded with a natural connectivity, regardless of the specific selection.

Malone was featured on “Candlelight,” a dedication to guitarist Jim Hall. Vega soloed on “My Funny Valentine.” And Carter chose “You Are My Sunshine,” a classic country tune he also selected as an unlikely solo vehicle a couple of years ago in a performance at Royce Hall.

A veteran player who was highly visible for years as a close musical companion to Diana Krall, Malone brought his far-ranging versatile eclecticism to his solo passages. Blending fast-fingered virtuosity with appealing lyricism, his soloing recalled, and honored, similar qualities in Hall’s memorable playing.

Vega, a jazz prodigy as a teen-ager, now a mature artist, found new ideas in the often-played “My Funny Valentine.” Approaching the classic standard from a new perspective, he often lured Carter and Malone into collective passages, instantly providing contrast and support for his stunning solo lines.

And Carter, the most recorded bassist in jazz history, once again had fun with “You Are My Sunshine.” Approaching his instrument with the pizzicato accents of a cello, he roved freely across the familiar melody. Digging into its roots, lining up the theme in his own unique fashion, his playing occasionally recalled a classic version of the tune recorded by Sheila Jordan and George Russell. But by the time he had melded his soloing back into the Trio collectivity, he had completely made it his own.

No wonder the audience was so reluctant to allow the Carter Trio to leave the stage. The opportunity to hear a performance as stunningly imaginative as his Trio had offered was a rare experience indeed. And this listener, no doubt like the rest of the applauding crowd, looks forward to the music Ron Carter will bring to his next, too-rare appearance in the Southland.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.


Live Music: Chris Botti and Chris Isaak at the Hollywood Bowl

July 14, 2014

By Don Heckman

There were two guys named Chris on stage at the Hollywood Bowl Friday and Saturday nights. Despite their identical first names, their styles traced to very different genres. And despite those different sources, they both offered performances rich in musicality and compelling entertainment.

Friday evening opened with the first Chris – jazz trumpeter Chris Botti — backed by his own group and the Los Angeles Philharmonic under the baton of Bramwell Tovey.

Chris Botti

Chris Botti

Although Botti was often identified with the smooth jazz style in his early years, he has always been a player whose music was filled with the authority of jazz authenticity. Over the past two decades his ever-curious, inventive imagination has taken him to jazz settings reaching from performances with full symphonic orchestras, to straight ahead mainstream jazz, and explorations reaching the outer limits of free improvisations.

Much of that territory was explored in his gripping performance at the Bowl.

Botti began with a warm tribute to Miles Davis, applying his trademark, warm tone to a composition long associated with Davis – Rodrigo’s Concierto De Aranjuez. To Botti’s credit, he made the piece’s lush Spanish melodies his own. He was equally expressive with Davis’ “Flamenco sketches.

And when he added some familiar standards – “When I Fall In Love” and “The Very Thought of You” – he once again emphasized his embracingly warm sound and expressive tone to every melodic phrase.

Botti also showcased his skills as a leader, urging the members of his band – pianist Geoff Keezer, guitarist Ben Butler, bassist Richie Goods and drummer Billy Kilson – into their own far-reaching skills. Add to that the mesmerizing violin playing of guest artist Caroline Campbell on the Grammy-nominateed “Emmanuel,” as well as George Komsky’s soaring vocal rendering on “Time To Say Goodbye,” and the stunning versatility of singer Sy Smith.

And I’d be remiss if I didn’t also mention Botti’s easygoing communication with his audience. Strolling the stage, offering occasional interchanges with his listeners, he added a quality of warm connectivity too rarely seen in jazz performances.

Chris Isaak

One could also say the same about the other Chris on the program – rocker, singer/songriter, actor and talk show host Chris Isaak. Completely at home on the broad Bowl stage, Isaak moved into an even wider arena, moving across the narrow platform intersecting the box seats, then demanding a spotlight as he moved into the audience itself, singing, shaking hands with listeners, welcoming them throughout his set into an environment as comfortable as his living room.

Thirty years after he made his first recording, Silvertone, Isaak still maintains a dedicated audience. And his set embraced many of the high points of his twelve album discography. Add to that the numerous songs and musical themes he’s created for television and films.

His entertaining program encompassed memorable selections from all those sources. Among them: what is perhaps his best known song, “Wicked Game.” Add to that “Baby Did A Bad, Bad Thing” from the Kubrick film, Eyes Wide Shut and a string of a dozen or so somewhat less familiar, but equally compelling songs.

Strongly supported by his comfortable ease with his enthusiastic audience, and buoyed by his solid back up band, the lead guitar work of Hershel Yatovitz and lush timbres of the Los Angeles Phil, Isaak presented a program reaching far beyond his rock roots.

The program closed with yet another highlight: Chris Botti and Chris Isaak performing together in a brief set blending their disparate but amiable skills in tunes reaching from “Besame Mucho” to “Love Me Tender.” Call it the appropriate climax for a two-Chris performance to remember.


Live Jazz: The KJAZZ Summer Benefit Concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall

June 30, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles.  There was a full house, enthusiastic crowd in attendance Saturday night at Disney Hall for the KJAZZ benefit concert. As there should have been.

The importance of FM radio station KJAZZ 88.1 to jazz fans cannot be under-estimated. I may not agree with the programming 100% of the time, but KJAZZ is nonetheless at the top of our radio buttons, in our cars and our living room. And deejays such as Bubba Jackson, Helen Borgers, LeRoy Downs, Bob Parlocha and others have become familiar and friendly jazz voices.

There was a lot to like about the KJAZZ benefit concert, as well. The presence of singer Steve Tyrell and pianist Jason Moran as headliners offered a range of jazz elements, with a lot to please different tastes.

Steve Tyrell

Steve Tyrell

Tyrell, as always, applied his appealing Texas twang and gently swinging jazz phrasing to a scintillating list of offerings from the Great American Songbook. Ranging from standards such as “It Had To Be You” and “I’ll Take Romance” to more recent singer/songwriter items such as “On Broadway” and “Will You Still Love Me,” he thoroughly demonstrated his authenticity as an appealing jazz artist.

Jane Monheit

Jane Monheit

On several numbers he was joined by the warmly engaging vocalizing of Jane Monheit and the articulate playing of pianist and KJAZZ deejay David Benoit.

The evening was kicked off by the highly regarded young pianist Jason Moran. Praised by the New York Times, Down Beat and Jazz Times, he quickly revealed the adventurous quality of his playing.

Jason Moran

Jason Moran

At the heart of his imaginative improvising, Moran approached the piano in a way reflecting the view of the instrument as an orchestra in itself. While some of his excursions roved into complex, busy-fingered areas, he was never less than an appealing artist, and surely one of the finest jazz artists of his generation.

Add to all that, there was the presence of a stellar back up band including pianist Quinn Johnson, guitarist Steve Cotter, trumpeter Bijon Watson, bassist Lyman Medeiros and drummer Kevin Winard. Along with especially appealing solo efforts from Cotter, Johnson and Watson.

Call it a memorable evening – one that informed, entertained and reminded us of the significance of KJAZZ as a valued entity in the Southland jazz community. Let’s hope that the concert raised the funds needed to keep KJAZZ alive, well and swinging.

* * * * * * * *

 Steve Tyrell photo by Bob Barry.

Jane Monheit photo by Faith Frenz.

Jason Moran photo by Tony Gieske.

 


Picks of the Week: June 24 – 29

June 24, 2014

By Don Heckman

Summer has arrived, with all its distractions, and many of the music venues — in the U.S., Europe and beyond — are either closed or booking with reduced schedules.  But there’s still good music to be heard.

Los Angeles

Annie Trousseau

Annie Trousseau

- June 25. (Wed.) Annie Trousseau. Multi-lingual singer Trousseau is described in her press material as offering “some impressive musical reminders of Edith Piaf and Marlene Dietrich.” Which should make for an evening of eminently fascinating music. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- June 26. (Thurs.) “Tenors For Two” Tenor saxophonists Tom Peterson and Roger Neumann recall the jazz glory days of the “battling tenors.” Expect these two fine players to stretch the limits. Vitello’s. (818) 769-0905.

- June 26. (Thurs.) Heartbeat Brazil. They may be Los Angeles-based, but Heartbeat Brazil approaches classic Brazilian music with a convincingly authentic approach to bossa nova, samba, etc. And the highlight of the night may well be the presence of guest singer, Jason Gould, Barbra Streisand’s son. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Jack Jones

Jack Jones

- June 27 & 28. (Fri. & Sat.) Jack Jones. Jones’ mellow, baritone voice carried the torch for traditional pop music during the rock ‘n’ roll sixties. And the Grammy winner is still going strong, still recalling the glories of the Great American Songbook. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

- June 27 & 28: (Fri.,  & Sat.)  Andrea Marcovicci. Actress, singer, and “Queen of Cabaret,” Marcovicci’s resume reaches from the White House and Carnegie Hall to films and television.  She returns to celebrate her 29th Anniversary at The Gardenia with a program of torch songs titled “Let’s Get Lost.”  The Gardenia.

- June 28. (Sat.) KJAZZ Summer Benefit Concert. Aways one of the most memorable musical experiences of the year, the annual KJAZZ Benefit concert features Steve Tyrell, Jane Monheit, Jason Moran and David Benoit. Don’t miss this one. Disney Hall.  (562) 985-2999.

- June 29. (Sun.) Moulin Russe. Cabaret meets jazz when the Moulin Russe performers bring the delights of traditional French music, in all its glories, to Los Angeles. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

San Francisco

Rickie Lee Jones

Rickie Lee Jones

- June 27 & 28. (Fri. & Sat,) Rickie Lee Jones. Crossing comfortably from jazz to pop in the ’70s and ’80s, identifying herself as a high visibility star and winning Grammys along the way, Jones was one of the most signigicant artists of her generation. Yoshi’s San Francisco.  (415) 655-5600.

Boston

- June 26. (Thurs.) Sadao Watanabe. One of the rare Japanese to break into the national jazz arena, Watanabe thoroughly established himself as a significant player; and he’s still going strong at 80. Regatta Bar.  (617) 661-5000.

New York City

Tierney Sutton

Tierney Sutton

- June 24 – 28. (Tues. – Sat.) The Tierney Sutton Quartet. “After Blue: The Joni Mitchell Project.” Sutton and her band have been creating some of the most impressive vocal jazz of the past decade. The stunning versions of Joni Mitchell classics featured on her most recent CD will provide the centerpiece for her current tour. Birdland.  (212) 581-3080.

- June 25 – 28. (Wed. – Sat.) Stanley Jordan. Famous for his unique method of playing the guitar with a string tapping technique, Jordan creates some of the jazz world’s most appealing sounds. Iridium.  (212) 582-2121.

London

- June 24 – 28. (Tues. – Sat.) Curtis Stigers. Singer/saxophonist continues to establish himself as one of the rare male jazz vocal artists on the current scene. Ronnie Scott’s.  (0)20 7439 0747.

Tokyo

- June 28 – 30. (Sat. – Mon.) Pete Escovedo Latin Jazz Orchestra. Featuring Sheila E. It’s always family time when the Escovedos get together on stage. And anyone who hears them in action leaves with significant musical memories. The Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.

 

 

 


Live Jazz: Chambers, Herbert & Ellis at The Gardenia.

June 22, 2014

By Don Heckman

Hollywood, CA. Chambers, Herbert & Ellis. The names may not be as familiar as Lambert,Hendricks & Ross. At least not yet. But Friday night’s performance by Pierre Chambers, Lisa Herbert and Mitch Ellis at The Gardenia Supper Club provided an impressive introduction to a trio of singers with both the desire and the skill to carry the musical torch lit by L, H & R during their stellar career in the jazz spotlight.

Most of the Chambers, Herbert & Ellis briskly swinging set traced to their deep affection for their iconic predecessors. The highlights included such familiar items as L.H & R’s versions of “Moanin’,” “Everyday I Have the Blues,” “Centerpiece,” “Cloudburst” and “Come On Home.” And they were delivered with an irresistible blend of relaxed swing and musical authenticity.

Mitch Ellis, Lisa Herbert and Pierre Chambers

Mitch Ellis, Lisa Herbert and Pierre Chambers

Add to that a collection of somewhat less familiar pieces as well as a few offbeat tunes, some reflecting the musical family linkages among C, H & E. Among them: “Detour Ahead” (co-written by guitarist Herb Ellis, Mitch Ellis’ father), “Alicia” (by Mort Herbert and Herb Ellis); and “Dear Anne” (written by Pierre Chambers with his father, bassist Paul Chambers.); as well as “Midnight Indigo” and “Caravan” (by Jon Hendricks and Duke Ellington).

That’s an impressive program of music, by any definition. And Chambers, Herbert and Ellis handled it with ease. Lisa Herbert’s far ranging voice soared unerringly across the tops of the harmonies, occasionally popping out high Ds and E flats – reminiscent of Annie Ross, but expressively delivered in her own unique fashion.

Mitch Ellis was equally articulate with a variety of demanding, but improvisationally compelling vocalese passages. Chambers countered with rich baritone phrases and masterful blues and balladry. And the singers were ably supported by pianist Jamieson Trotter, bassist Karl Vincent and drummer Peter Buck.

Mitch Ellis, Lisa Herbert and Pierre Chambers

Mitch Ellis, Lisa Herbert and Pierre Chambers

As they approach their fourth anniversary as a jazz vocal ensemble, Chambers, Herbert & Ellis have still not yet reached the widespread audience their music deserves. A recording is reportedly in the works – hopefully one which will introduce jazz vocal fans to C, H & E’s compelling music.

The trio is also scheduled to return to The Gardenia for a reprise in the near future. And the club’s intimate environs provide the perfect setting for the opportunity to see and hear these gifted singers up close and personal.

Don’t miss the recording or their repeat appearance at The Gardenia., To check the club’s schedule, click HERE.

* * * * * * * *

Photos courtesy of Chambers, Herbert & Ellis.


Picks of the Weekend in Los Angeles: June 19 – 22

June 18, 2014

By Don Heckman

With Summer arriving in all its glory, I thought it would be helpful to concentrate the Picks for this long, mid-June weekend on the rich array of music to be heard here in the Southland.

Sally Kellerman

Sally Kellerman

- June 19. (Thurs.) Sally Kellerman. Sally’s back, and that’s great news for all fans of irresistible singing. Better known to many as “Hot Lips” from her role in the film version of Mash, Sal is a vocalist who brings vivid, story-telling qualities to every song. Click HERE to read an iRoM review of one of her recent Los Angeles performances. The Gardenia. (323) 467-7444.

- June 19 – 22. (Thurs. – Sun.) Marcus Miller. Multi-instrumentalist Miller, moving smoothly from bass clarinet, brings a sparkling array of jazz inventiveness to everything he plays. His current group includes saxophonist Alex Han, trumpeter Lee Hogans, keyboardist Brett Williams, guitarist Adam Agati and drummer Ronald Burneer, Jr. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (223) 466-2210.

John Chiodini

John Chiodini

- June 20, (Fri,) The Denny Seiwell Trio. Drummer Seiwell’s resume includes gigs with an array of world class bands in genres of every style. This time he leads his own stellar group, featuring John Chiodini, guitar and Joe Bagg, keyboards. Vitello’s.  (818) 769-0905.

- June 20. (Fri.) Chuck Manning and Steve Huffsteter. Two of the Southland’s most inventive jazz horn players, saxophonist Manning and trumpeter Huffsteter wrap their improvisational skills around every tune, stimulating each other’s creative imaginations. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

- June 20 & 21. (Fri. & Sat.) The John La Barbera Big Band. La Barbera’s Big Band hasn’t yet received the attention it deserves, and here’s a chance to see them in action in Sherman Oaks, on the broad stage of Jazz at the Cap.  (818) 990-2001.

- June 20 & 21. (Fri. & Sat.) Chambers, Herbert & Ellis. Here’s a rare, and not to be missed, display of jazz vocalese in the competent musical hands and soaring voices of this trio of world class singers. The Gardenia. (323) 467-7444.

- June 21. (Sat.) The Grand Reopening of the Alex Theatre.  Emmy and Tony award winning performer Martin Short joins Matt Catingub and the Glendale Pops Orchestra for a spectacular evening of song, dance, comedy and pure entertainment.  The Alex Theatre.  (818) 243-2611.

Les McCann and Lee Hartley

- June 21. (Sat.) Lee Hartley & the Les McCann All-Star Band. The appealing vocal team of Hartley and McCann are great on their own, and even better when their surrounded by the superb musical backing of guitarist John Chiodini, pianist Barney McClure, bassist Jim Hughart and drummer Enzo Tedesco. Jazz at the Rad.  (310) 216-5861.

- June 21. (Sat.) “Nutty.” Jazz for Jetsetters. This always-intriguing jazz octet applies a broad stylistic array of jazz rhythms and styles to their interpretations of pop and rock classics. If you loved the ’60s, dopn’t miss these guys. Steamers.  (714) 871-8800.

- June 21. (Sat.) Opening Night at the Bowl. The Hollywood Bowl kicks off a spectacular Summer season with the induction of Kristin Chenoweth, The Go-Go’s and Pink Martini into the . The celebration will climax with a spectacular fireworks display.  Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame (323) 850-2000.

 

 

 


Live Jazz: Cheryl Bentyne at Vitello’s

May 26, 2014

By Don Heckman

Studio City CA. There was no doubt in my mind that Cheryl Bentyne would deliver a memorable performance at Vitello’s Saturday night. I just didn’t know how memorable it would be.

Fully returned to performing action after recovering from a life threatening illness, Cheryl was in peak condition. She had been a dynamic member of the Manhattan Transfer, singing superb vocal harmonies for more than three decades. Since then she has further demonstrated the range of her remarkable singing skills, occasionally as a soloist, more often in a duet format with singer Mark Winkler.

In this performance she was in the spotlight for the entire show, backed by pianist Rich Eames, bassist Chris Coalangelo and drummer Dave Tull. And the musical interaction was world class, on all levels.

The primary theme that continually flowed through Cheryl’s performance was her consummate skill at musical storytelling. Whether she was swinging hard on an up tempo, leisurely working her way through a touching ballad, or mixing scat phrases with lyrical passages, she was always in complete, intimate contact with the words she was singing, transforming virtually every song into an irresistible musical short story.

Start with the fascinating program of tunes that Cheryl assembled. She could easily have done what many other singers do – simply worked her way through a familiar program of American Songbook classics. Instead, she blended songs from a variety of sources – including a few familiar Songbook items, as well as some lesser known, but equally compelling tunes.

She began, for example, with “Love For Sale,” singing it in a crisply swinging ¾. Then, perhaps in a wryly humorous gesture, she followed it with “If I Told You I Loved You, I Lied.”
In another unusual pairing, she introduced Stephen Sondheim’s “Losing My Mind” with an appropriately sardonic poem by Dorothy Parker.

Add to that another intriguing combination, including “It’s The Talk of the Town” (sung with the verse) followed by “Get Out of Town.”

Beyond the song pairings, there were other offbeat items. Among them, the cabaret classic, “Something Cool”; a stunning scat duet between Cheryl and drummer Tull on “You’d Be So Nice to Come Home to”; the mesmerizing, but too rarely heard Patricia Barber song, “I Could Eat Your Words.”

As if that wasn’t enough, she also offered her takes on Bobby Troup’s “The Meaning of the Blues,” on “Begin the Beguine,” “I Concentrate on You,” “It’s Delovely,” and more.

Looking at the list of numbers sung by Cheryl in one evening performance, one could be impressed by her musical versatility alone. But with the best singers – and Cheryl is definitely one of the best – it’s not just the program of material. It’s what’s done with the material.

Cheryl is a brilliantly engaging performer, inviting her receptive audience into a constantly changing orbit, hard swinging at times, humorous on occasions, musically intimate on ballads, and always interacting with Eames, Coangelo and Tull with fully collegial musicianship.

Summing up, this was another remarkable and, yes, memorable performance by one of the musical world’s most gifted artists. Like a previous appearance she made at Vitellos, a little over a year ago, it whet the musical appetite for more opportunities to hear Cheryl Bentyne explore the full length and breadth of her bewitching creative talents.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.

 


Live Music: Lynda Carter at Catalina Bar & Grill

April 15, 2014

By Don Heckman

Hollywood, CA.  A full house doesn’t completely describe the crowd that was virtually overflowing the room at Catalina Bar & Grill Saturday night. But it wasn’t surprising, given the fact that the headliner was Lynda Carter. And that was exciting news for anyone who was a television fan back in the seventies.

Why? Because Lynda Carter was Wonder Woman. Add to that, she also won the Miss World USA Pageant in 1972 and appeared in numerous television specials, as well.

Lynda Carter

Lynda Carter

Carter did not, of course, take the stage at Catalina’s wearing her Wonder Woman costume. (Although it would have pleased a substantial number of fans – especially males – if she had.) But the truth is that many in the full house crowd seemed pleased to see and hear Lynda Carter the singer, rather than Lynda Carter, Wonder Woman.

And with good reason. Although she continues to draw value out of her past Wonder Woman identity, Carter has become a world class performer who moves with impressive musicality through genres reaching from pop and r&b to country music.

Lynda Carter and her band

Lynda Carter and her band

Backed by a stellar band and an equally skilled group of back up singers, she was also a convincing entertainer. Gracing the stage with her lithe movements, communicating warmly with her listeners between numbers, she convincingly affirmed performing skills that reached well beyond her role as a superhero.

Lynda Carter and her back up singers

Lynda Carter and her back up singers

Carter’s program underscored the range of her many abilities. Among the richly varied tunes she included The Black Peas’s “Lonely Boy,” a new Sam Cooke song, Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m on Fire” and Christina Aguilera’s “Candy Man.”

Lynda Carter

Lynda Carter

Add to that such familiar items as “I Heard It Through The Grapevine,” “Fever,” and “God Bless The Child,” capping her show with “Let the Good Times Roll.”

Carter and her fine musicians and singers handled the varied styles with an ease that generated enthusiastic audience responses all the way to the final encore.

No, it wasn’t Wonder Woman. But when Lynda Carter stepped to the microphone, it was all music, and memorable music at that.

* * * * * * * *

Photos by Faith Frenz.


Photo Review: Bianca Rossini at Vibrato Grill Jazz etc…

April 6, 2014

By Don Heckman

Photos By Faith Frenz

Bel Air, CA. Bianca Rossini brought a colorful touch of Brazil to Vibrato Grill Jazz..etc. Thursday night. The busy actress/singer/songwriter and author makes rare live performances. But when she does, they showcase all of her many skills, enlivened by the rich, emotional Brazilian roots that are at the heart of her art.

Most of her selections, chosen from Rossini’s growing collection of original songs, were sung with the solid backing of keyboardist Yuko Tamura, guitarist Capital Violao Guitarra, bassist Sezin Ahmet Turkmenoglu and drummer Aaron Rafael Serfaty.

The songs covered everything from captivating bossa novas to ballads and rhythm tunes. Understandably, the often uneven aspects of the material reflected the fact that Rossini works with a range of writing partners. But it was her dark-toned voice and dramatic presentation that brought all the music together into one engaging interpretation after another.

Since Rossini’s performance was so visually oriented, emphasizing her lithe and expressive skills as a dancer and actress, it seemed appropriate to call in our stellar photographer, Faith Frenz, to provide a colorful photo essay of Bianca Rossini in action.

Bianca Rossini and her band

Bianca Rossini and her band

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

Bianca Rossini

Bianca Rossini

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 220 other followers