Picks of the Week in Los Angeles, Seattle, New York City, London, Copenhagen and Tokyo

March 23, 2015

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

Manhattan Transfer

Manhattan Transfer

– Mar. 23 & 24 (Mon. & Tues.) Manhattan Transfer and Take 6.  The two most masterful vocal ensembles of the past few decades get together for the first time. No wonder it’s called “The Summit” as they perform at the start of a national tour. Catalina Bar & Grill .

(323) 466-2210.

Michael TIlson Thomas

Michael TIlson Thomas

– Mar. 24. (Tues.) The London Philharmonic conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas with pianist Yuja Wang. Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F, Sibelius’ Symphony No. 2 and Bitten’s Four Sea Interludes. Disney Hall. (323) 850-2000.

– Mar. 26. (Thurs.) Sue Raney. She’s been receiving accolades for her singing sine she was a teen-ager, and Sue Raney is as dynamic and musically compelling as she was shen she first stepped on stage. Sue’s celebrating the release of her album, Late in Life.        Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

Bob Sheppard and Pat Senatore

Bob Sheppard and Pat Senatore

– Mar. 27 (Fri.) Bob Sheppard with the Pat Senatore Trio. A musical encounter not to be missed. Sheppard is one of the jazz world’s most versatile,saxophonists, and equally gifted on clarinet and flute. He’ll be backed by bassist Senatore’s equally adept rhythm section. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400

–  Mar. 27. (Fri.) George Benson. Hitmaker singer/guitarist Benson is always entertaining, always disovering new jazz territories. Expect to hear some familiar songs. Segerstrom Center for the Arts. (714) 556-2787.

Art Pepper

Art Pepper

– Mar. 27. (Fri.) An All Star Celebration of Art Pepper. With Richie Cole, Doug Webb, Don Shelton, Gaspare Pasini, the Art Pepper Quartet Reunion and more. Presented by Ken Poston’s West Coast Jazz Heritage Series. Hermosa Beach Community Theatre. Reservations: (562) 200-5477.

Seattle

– Mar. 26. (Thurs.) Great Guitars! Featuring Bucky Pizzarelli, John Pisano and Mundell Lowe. “Great Guitars” doesn’t begin to describe this encounter between such Olympian players. Don’t miss this one; it’s a true musical rarity. Jazz Alley. (206) 441-9729.

New York City

 

Dee Dee Bridgewater

Dee Dee Bridgewater

– Mar. 24 – 29. (Tues. – Sun.) James Moody 90th Birthday. Saxophonist/singer Moody was a much loved and honored jazz artist. He was also a friend to almost everyone he met. So it’s no surprise that this tribute has attracted such stellar participants. Featured peformers include Dee Dee Bridgewater, James Carter, Antonio Hart, Russle Malone, Randy Brecker, Roberta Gambarini, Roy Hargrove, Janis Siegel and more. Call the club for schedules. The Blue Note. (212) 475-8592.

London

– Mar. 24 – 26. (Tues. – Thurs.) The Bireli Lagrene Gypsy Project. Gypsy jazz at its best. Calling up memories of Django Reinhardt and the unque, swinging improvisational style he brought to the jazz world. Ronnie Scott’s. +44 20 7439 0747

Copenhagen

– Mar. 26 – 28. (Thurs. – Sat. Rosa Passos Quartet. Passos is one of the true blenders of jazz and Brazilian rhythms. She’s been doing it a long time, and she still does better than most. Jazzhus Montmartre. +45 31 72 34 94

Tokyo

Gerald Albright

Gerald Albright

 

– Mar. 24. (Tues.) Gerald Albright. Name a jazz genre and Gerald Albright can play it convincingly.  And he’s equally adept as an instrumentalist, moving easily from world class saxophone playing to bass, keyboards,, vocals and more.  Don’t miss him in action.  Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.


Live Music: The Ghazal Ensemble at the Skirball Cultural Center

March 18, 2015

By Bonnie Perkinson

March is a festive month. In India there is Holi, a festival of color and love, good over evil. It is mentioned in the Vedas, the most sacred books of India and the earliest record of Indo-Aryan civilization. Persia gives us Nowruz, celebrating rebirth and a joyous sense of belonging, going back thousands of years to Zoroastrianism.

Both festivals mark the end of winter and the arrival of abundance and with it, the joy of Spring.

On Sunday, March 15, the Ides of March (a Roman Holiday), the place to be was the Skirball Cultural Center. What a delight to welcome Springtime with the Ghazal Ensemble.

the Ghazal Ensemble

the Ghazal Ensemble

We had the privilege of hearing a musical marriage of two majestic cultures. The exquisite interplay of Indian Raga and Persian Dastgah, with their many tonal similarities, enables them to converse naturally. In the hands of the unparalleled musicians of the Ghazal Ensemble, the music soared.

Simply put, Raga is Sanskit for the act of coloring or dyeing the  mind, mood and emotions. (A tonal framework for composition and improvisation.) Dastgah is Persian for “pattern” or “set of directions”. (A musical modal system in traditional Persian music.)

The Ghazal Ensemble included three remarkable artists:

Shujaat Husain Khan

Shujaat Husain Khan

 

 

Shujaat Husain Khan, a legendary sitar player, born in Calcutta to a family of  musicians going back seven generations.

Kayhan Kalhor

Kayhan Kalhor

 

 

 

 

 

Kayhan Kalhor, born in Teheran, an innovative master of the kamancheh (Persian spiked fiddle).

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Sandeep Das

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandeep Das, an acclaimed tabla player, born in Patna, the capital of Bihar in northern India, who performed at the age of 16 with the late Pandit Ravi Shankar, rounded out the pulsating trio.

 

 

All of these gentlemen are composers and peerless on their instruments. Shujaat Khan also has a superb voice. More than once we had the pleasure of hearing him sing. He sounded magnificent and noble.

With the enormity of talent on stage from these Grammy-nominated premier musicians, the audience knew it was  going to be an excursion into human emotion from the first note.

Four ragas were performed: Ragas Darbari and Yaman, both night ragas; a south Indian raga called Kirwani; and Raga Pahadi, a most beautiful and touching raga, informed by the mountains near Shujaat Khan’s childhood home,.

Each piece was transcendent, full of longing, fulfillment and grace. One moment the music took its listeners on an exploration of deep melancholic depths, perhaps surrendering to tears for those who were brave enough. Next, fireworks of jubilation took place with seismic shifts of rhythm moving us to rapturous heights of hope.

The Ghazal Ensemble nurtured the listener with profound soulfulness, inventive improvisation, tenderness, and illuminated the triumphant power of love, as music can do, in the hands of grand and masterful inventors. A perfect way to welcome Spring.

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Photos by photo-journalist Bonnie Perkinson.


Live Music and More: Allessandra Belloni’s Tarantata Spider Dance at Redcat

February 6, 2015

by Jane Rosenberg

With her compelling stage presence, throaty mezzo, and raging tambourine, Allessandra Belloni is a force of nature. Through Southern Italian folk music, chant, and dance, Belloni and her company explored the sound and movement world of tarantella trance dancing at Disney Hall’s Redcat.

Allessandra Belloni

Allessandra Belloni

Tarantella traces its roots back to Greco-Roman times. The purging of a woman’s thwarted desires through ecstatic trance dancing, accompanied by vibrant percussion, was precipitated by the bite of the tarantula or “spider love bite.”

In Belloni’s contemporary manifestation, dancers spin, shake convulsively, and writhe on the floor. If this sounds like a personal exorcism of sorts, it is; and this is where the problem of performance sets in. As a healing rite it may have its benefits, or as a fascinating demonstration of an ancient folk tradition it’s effective. But as a two-act dance drama, strung together by narration, it fails. Dancers mime or perform choreographed routines that seem stilted rather than ecstatic. Only Belloni and one of her lead dancers are up to the task.

Belloni’s virtuosity on the tambourine is without question. Along with traditional instruments played onstage by an ensemble of musicians, her music director, Joe Deninzon adds modern electronic dance beats. I suspect this is the reason Belloni’s expressive voice is over amplified with an unfortunate loss of complexity and subtlety.

To be in Belloni’s presence, without the interference of electronic music, amplification, or the distraction of other performers, to my mind, would be the perfect way to sample the tarantella and connect to the true meaning of the spider dance.

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To read more dance and music reviews by Jane Rosenberg click HERE.

Jane Rosenberg Dance Book cover.

Jane Rosenberg is the author and illustrator of  DANCE ME A STORY: Twelve Tales of the Classic Ballets.  Jane is also the author and illustrator of SING ME A STORY: The Metropolitan Opera’s Book of Opera Stories for Children

 


Live Music and a Lot More: MY DAY AT THE NAMM SHOW

January 28, 2015

By Mike Finkelstein

Anaheim, CA.  For anyone who appreciates music, the NAMM show is a scene you simply must make once in your life, maybe more. NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) convenes twice annually, once in the winter at the Anaheim Convention Center and once in the summer, in Nashville. It has become more than a convention, and is now a four day event attended by thousands, with awards given to distinguished artists and manufacturers, concerts all day outdoors on a huge stage, celebrity signings, ongoing celebrity jams, intriguing food trucks, plenty of free stuff, and a whole lot of entertaining people to watch.

I was struck by how many people appeared to be dressed in their rock star costumes. These folks must look like they are on or near a stage every day. The multi-color hair and bizarre tats and piercings are a long-term proposition, a commitment. Of course, that’s rock and roll and we do love it. There were even people in costumes running around simply to provide photo ops, but that felt schticky, a little like Hollywood and Highland.

NAMM floor is a busy place, man!

Entry to NAMM is exclusive. Everyone who gets in must apply for and receive a badge to get through the doors. Physically getting to those doors isn’t so easy, either, as parking is at a premium. I had to park about a mile away from the site, and hoof it in. But it was a gorgeous day and I was with many other like-minded souls so it was cool…and free. Inside the convention center, vendors build a four story musical city, a multi-tiered grid of all conceivable music gear. And sometimes getting from one side of an aisle to the other is not unlike jaywalking in New York City. One must be alert as there are throngs of folks in constant motion on the NAMM floor.

Since so many manufacturers are represented under one roof, you can explore any curiosity on the spot, at the source. This worked out well for me. I cruised into the plush-carpeted Rickenbacker display, giddily strummed several of the shiny guitars, and inquired as to how pros actually deal with restringing their (in)famous 12-strings. These beautiful beasts are a well-known source of aggravation because the whole guitar must be unstrung and laboriously restrung even when one only string is a problem. But I was let in on the masking tape and long nose pliers solution to make things more efficient. Still, the ultra inconvenient “R” tailpiece will endure, as its design is classic and a part of an enduring image. Of course, the equally cool Ricky basses, have a much more string friendly design and will also stay the same.

The Rickenbacker 12 String

Before going to the NAMM show I wasn’t aware that guitar straps actually come in sizes like shirts do. So within a short exchange of dialogue I had learned about strap sizing. I also learned that there are several names for the extension adjustment strap on a leather guitar strap (“tongue” was the best that I heard), that they are sold separately, and can extend a strap by as much as 12 inches. The big idea was that huge vendors only carry some of many things. There is more variety available if one goes straight to the manufacturer, online or in person, than if one goes to a big distributor.

I had a feeling there would be some pleasant surprises nestled into the NAMM grid. Would you believe that somebody developed a product that allows you to actually be heard playing air drums? Yes, a special high-speed camera program gauges your movements, anticipating which drums you are reaching for and attaches sound. Voila, you can be heard. It was uncanny to watch, like some sort of illusion.

Fenders at NAMM. Surf all day, record all night… sounds like a plan!

One thing about the NAMM show, it borders on a muted din most of the time. There are so many displays where you can pick up an instrument to play and whether it was pianos, trumpets, or drums, there were usually a good dozen artists and regular folks just bashing away ecstatically. It’s a great way to make that much noise. The drum neighborhood at the end of the day was particularly lively. Big jam sessions up and down the block at every booth.

Perhaps the coolest thing about the NAMM show is that there are small concerts going on all the time in the booths. And a lot of these gigs are phenomenal. Sometimes it’s one person playing over a pre-recorded backing track. Other times it’s a whole ensemble.

Albert Lee bringing it at Music Man

These jams can get crowded but wow, if you have a good spot you’re in for a treat. I got lucky three times. Albert Lee was tearing it up at Music Man, and then I happened over to Godin guitars where Jose Roberto Hernandez and his friends were doing a sublime job of it. Beautiful guitar work from Hernandez, violin, acoustic bass guitar, and three hand percussionists made for some amazing, layered, poly-rhythmic music. Words won’t do it justice. On the other hand, I really couldn’t get a view of John Popper at Fender or of Doug Wimbash at Burgera.

All star jam in honor of Slash with Skunk Baxter, Richie Sambora, and Orianthi.

The best jam I saw was by far at the Mark Bass booth. If you can believe it, about thirty of us got to watch as guitarist Frank Gambale and six string bass ace Alain Caron strutted their chops and soared into the stratosphere together. The grin on our faces, and on theirs, was ear to ear. One person in the crowd actually had to steady the keyboard from falling off the corner of the amp it was perched upon. It was that casual, and yet that good.

Up on the third floor the heavy hitters of guitar set up shop with lavish booths and lots of decor. This would be Fender, Gibson, ESP, Schecter, and Paul Reed Smith. ESP in particular, had some sculpted guitars that looked as impressive as they were close to unplayable for more than an encore…or a photo session. Paul Reed Smith exhibited some wild inlay work, too.

Elaborate inlay work at Paul Reed Smith

Gibson had a whole table of headphones and Les Pauls to play privately, much like you would see in the Apple store. They seemed to be pushing their self-tuning guitar heads, but hey, the one I played just got confused and like in some silly sci-fi movie, the tuning heads spun about, taking the guitar nowhere close to being tuned. Hmm…

Gibson allowed us to plug in and play loud distorted guitar ...to ourselves.

Gibson allowed us to plug in and play loud distorted guitar …to ourselves.

At the big name booths I saw a whole lotta desks in sound-proof offices for making deals. People were here to deal and there was plenty of that going on. You literally couldn’t walk across the Martin Guitar booth without an obstacle course of office furniture. And interestingly enough, when I played one of their $6000 guitars, there was so much general commotion that I could scarcely hear what I was playing. It happens.

At six o’clock the lights dimmed as I was being serenaded with Norteno music and learning about Bajo Sextos and Bajo Quintos. That was a great little session. The show was over and it was time for most of us to trudge to our cars, while in the banquet rooms the VIP’s were just warming up for a night of music and awards. Just another day at the NAMM show. I was happily drained on the way home.

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Photos by Mike Finkelstein. 

To read more posts by Mike Finkelstein click HERE.

 


Picks of the Week: January 5 – 11

January 6, 2015

As we move into the first weeks of 2015, the iRoM Picks of the Week will begin to reach beyond the Los Angeles-centric choices of the past few years. We will, of course, continue to survey L.A.’s ever-changing banquet of musical pleasures. But we will also begin to highlight and emphasize a broad range of choices reflecting the International perspective which is at the heart of our mission and our name.

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

Michael TIlson Thomas

Michael TIlson Thomas

– Jan. 9 – 11. (Fri. – Sun.) The Los Angeles Philharmonic. Michael Tilson Thomas celebrates his 70th birthday by conducting the L.A. Phil. and the Los Angeles Master Chorale in a spectacular, world premiere production of Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis with video and lighting design. Disney Hall.  (323) 850-2000.

– Jan. 9 – 11. (Fri. – Sun.) The Lee Ritenour Band. He’s been called “Captain Fingers” for his impressive guitar technique, but Ritenour is also an imaginative, hard swinging jazz artist. He performs here with the fine backing of Dave Weckl, drums, Tom Kennedy, bass and pianist Makoto Ozone. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

– Jan. 6. (Tues.) John Proulx Trio. Proulx is on many first-call lists for his fine piano work. But Proulx is an engaging vocalist as well, building a career as a prime entry in the slowly growing cadre of male jazz singers. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Carol Bach-y-Rita

Carol Bach-y-Rita

– Jan. 11. (Sun.) Carol Bach-y-Rita. A singer with a voice to remember, Bach-y-Rita (her name is Catalan) brings convincing interpretations and rhythmic ease to songs reaching from samba and salsa to crisp jazz rhythms, often in 4 or 5 languages. She’s especially worth seeing and hearing in the elegant setting of Herb Alpert’s Vibrato Grill Jazz..etc. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

San Francisco

– Jan. 8 – 11, (Thurs. – Sun.) Pharoah Sanders. The far-reaching jazz explorations of the avant-garde ’60s are still alive and well in Sanders’ adventurous tenor saxophone. An SFJAZZ event at Miner Auditorium (866) 920-5299.

- Jan. 9. (Fri.)  The San Francisco Symphony and The Godfather.  Justin Freer conducts the Symphony in a live orchestral performance of Nino Rota’s film score in sync with a screening of Francis Ford Coppola’s film masterpiece.  Davies Symphony Hall.  (415) 864-6000.

Oregon

Portland – Jan. 7. (Thurs.) The Mel Brown B3 Organ Group has been playing at Jimmy Mak’s in Portland for more than 16 years. No wonder George Benson once said “if this band played in New York City, they’d be a sensation.” Jimmy Mak’s.  (503) 295-6542.

Ashland – Jan. 9 & 10. (Fri. @ 7:30 p.m. & Sat. @ 3 p.m.) The Tesla Quartet. The stellar young artists in the Tesla Quartet have established themselves as a significant international chamber ensemble in the few years since they graduated from Julliard. They’ll perform works by Bartok, Dvorak, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Webern, Beethoven and others. Chamber Music Concert Series at Southern Oregon University Music Recital Hall.  (541) 552-6154.

New York City

Ravi Coltrane

Ravi Coltrane

– Jan. 6 – 11. (Tues. – Sun.) The Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour. Here’s a rare chance to experience some of the impressive music from what is arguably one of the finest jazz festivals in the world. The featured players in this stellar aggregation include trumpeter Terence Blanchard, saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and the Gerald Clayton Trio. The Blue Note. (212) 475-8592.

– Jan. 8 – 10. (Thurs. – Sat.) The 2015 NYC Winter Jazzfest. The three day Jazzfest, which takes place at theatres and clubs across Greenwich Village offers a rare display of jazz eclecticism. With talent ranging from iconic names to new arrivals, with stylistic explorations of every jazz genre, it provides a brilliant survey of jazz in all its irresistible shapes and forms. The 2015 Winterjazz Fest.

-Jan. 11. (Sun.) Lisa Hilton. Composer-pianist Hilton debuts new compositions from her album Horizons in a live performance with saxophonist J.D. Allen, drummer Rudy Royston, bassist Ben Street, and Ingrid Jensen on trumpet and flugelhorn. Carnegie Hall (Weill Recital Hall).

London

– Jan. 5 – 7. (Mon. – Wed.) Scott Hamilton Quartet. Jazz history, past and present is vividly alive in Hamilton’s buoyant tenor saxophone work. The Pizza Express Jazz Club Soho.

Tania Maria

Tania Maria

Milan

- Jan. 9 – 11. (Fri. – Sun.) Tania Maria. The loving partnership between Brazilian music and American jazz is on full display with everything the versatile Tania Maria sings and plays. The Blue Note Milano.  +39 02 6901 6888.

Switzerland

– Jan. 11. (Sun.) Lang Lang. The gifted young Chinese pianist makes one of his rare European appearances. Stadt-casino – Hans Huber Saal, Basel.

Andorra

Joshua Bell

Joshua Bell

– Jan. 9. (Fri.) Joshua Bell and his violin take center stage with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields European Tour: Andorra. The dynamic program reaches from Bach’s Violin Concerto in A minor, Mendelssohn’s The Hebrides, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 and Mozart’s Symphony No. 40. The tour also includes performances in Mannheim (Jan. 14), Vienna (Jan. 15) and Hamburg (Jan. 16).

 

Moscow

– Jan. 5 – 11. (Mon. – Sun. The Nutcracker: A Ballet in Two Acts. The Bolshoi Ballet accompanied by the Bolshoi Theatre Symphony Orchestra.

The Bolshoi Ballet

The Bolshoi Ballet

What will surely be a memorable performance in the Bolshoi Ballet and Opera Theatre.

Tokyo

Richard-Bona

Richard-Bona

– Jan. 10 & 11. (Sat. & Sun.) The Richard Bona Group. Bassist Bona, born in Cameroon, burst onto the New York jazz scene in the mid-’90s, quickly establishing his uniquely original style with the likes of George Benson, Branford Marsalis, Chaka Kahn Randy Brecker and others. Since then he’s led a sequence of his own musically compelling ensembles. Tokyo Blue Note.  +81 3-5485-0088.


Picks of the Week: December 1 – 7 in L.A. and Beyond

December 1, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

Eloise Laws nd Corky Hale

Eloise Laws nd Corky Hale

– Dec. 3. (Wed.) Corky Hale and Eloise Laws. Pianist/harpist and all around music master Hale gets together with the engaging, Laws family vocalist Eloise for an evening of prime time music making. Her appropriate title for the evening is “Sisters! A Salute to the Great Women of Jazz, featuring a special suprise guest. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

Gustavo Dudamel

Gustavo Dudamel

– Dec. 4 – 7. (Thurs. – Sun.) Gustavo Dudamel conducts the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Mussorgsky’s always compelling Pictures at an Exhibition. Disney Hall.  (323) 850-2000.

– Dec. 5. (Fri. ) Vijay Ayer: The Rites of Holi and Mutations I – X. Pianist/composer Ayer’s Rites of Holi was inspired by the Hindu Rite of Spring celebration and based upon Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring (on the classic work’s 100th anniversary).  The Music of Transformation, written for piano, string quartet and electronics is Ayer’s first classically oriented work, driven by the improvisational imagination central to his creativity.   A CAP UCLA at Royce Hall event.  (310) 825-2101.

Dr. John

Dr. John

– Dec. 6. (Sat.) Dr. John. New Orlean’s jazz piano/vocal master and his Night Trippers can be counted on to produce an evening filled with sounds to remember. A CAP UCLA at Royce Hall event.   (310) 825-2101.

– Dec. 6. (Sat.) Judy Collins. Any performance by Judy Collins is a special event. And even more so when she does her warmly captivating program of holiday songs. Segerstrom Center for the Arts.  (714) 556-2787.

– Dec. 6. (Sat.) Bill Cunliffe nnd Imaginacion. Pianist, composer and Grammy winner Cunliffe displays his mastery of the rhythmic pleasures of Latin jazz. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. (310) 474-9400.

Brad Mehldau

– Dec. 6. (Sat.) The Brad Mehldau Trio and The Bad Plus. Here’s an intriguing program contrasting the differing, but fascinating jazz adventuring of pianist Mehldau and the piano oriented trio work of The Bad Plus. Valley Performing Arts Center (818) 677-8800.

-Dec. 6 & 7. (Sat. & Sun.)  The Ron Carter Golden Striker  Trio and Kenny Barron with Dave Holland.  Once again, the Jazz Bakery is offering a weekend of music to remember.  And it doesn’t get any better than this.  Saturday’s program features the iconic bassist Ron Carter with pianist Donald Vega and guitarist Russell Malone.  On Sunday, a pair of jazz masters — pianist Kenny Barron and bassist Dave Holland — meet in what will surely be a primal jazz encounter.  Don’t miss this extraordinary weekend.  A pair of Jazz Bakery Movable Feasts — at Zipper Concert Hall in the Colburn School Saturday, and at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center on Sunday.  (310) 275-8961.

– Dec. 7. (Sun.) The Canadian Brass. First organized in 1970, the Canadian Brass quintet has gone through numerous personnel changes. But the quintet’s musical versatility has continued to increase. And they’re particularly engaging with their annual holiday program. Valley Performing Arts Center. (818) 677-8800.

San Francisco and Oakland

– Dec. 4. (Thurs.) Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet. Yet another talented member of the musically adept Marsalis family takes center stage, first as a drummer, more recently displaying his capacity to bring new life to the jazz vibraphone. SFJAZZ Center. (866) 920-5299.

Denny Zeitlin solo.

– Dec. 5. (Fri.) Denny Zeitlin. An Evening exploring the Seminal Early Compositions of Wayne Shorter. Piedmont Piano Company, Oakland. Pianist and composer Zeitlin has been one of the music world’s true multi-hyphenates for years, balancing a career as a psychiatrist/educator with decades of masterful jazz performances and recordings. This time out, he finds inspiration in a probing, inventive exploration of the music of Wayne Shorter. The Piedmont Piano Company.  (510) 547-8188.

Seattle

– Dec. 4 – 7. (Thurs. – Sun.) The Roy Hargrove Quintet. Trumpeter Hargrove takes a break from his big band to display his always top level skills in the jazz quintet format. Jazz Alley.   (206) 441-9729.

New York City

– Dec 2 – 7. (Tues. – Sun.) Pat Metheny Unity Group. Guitarist, like most world class jazz artists, is at his best when he’s leading a group of prime players, as he is here, with the sterling ensemble of saxophonist Chris Potter, bassist Ben Williams, drummer Antonio Sanchez and multi-instrumentalist Giulio Carmassi.  The Blue Note.  (212) 475-8592.

Eliane Elias

Eliane Elias

– Dec. 2 – 6. (Tues. – Sat.) Eliane Elias. As her many fans know, one can’t get enough of the piano and vocals of Elias, who is one of the true masters of an appealing blend of the lush pleasures of Brazilian music with imaginative excursions into jazz. Birdland.  212) 581-3080.

London

– Dec. 3. (Wed.) The London Philharmonic. Rachmaninoff: Inside Out. The Philharmonic explores the creative similarities of Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 1, Scriabin’s Piano Concerto in F# minor and Szymanowski’s Concert Overture. Vladimir Jurowski conducts, with pianio soloist Igor Levit. Royal Festival Hall Southbank Centre  +44 844 875 0073.

Copenhagen

– Dec. 3. (Wed.) Aaron Goldberg Trio. Pianist Goldberg’s long term relationship with bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Eric Harland is resulting in a convincingly contemporary incarnation of the classic jazz piano trio. Jazzhus Montmatre.  +45 31 72 34 94

Milan

Al Di Meola

Al Di Meola

– Dec. 3 – 6. (Wed. – Sat.) Al di Meola. Always creatively curious, in search of new jazz territory, guitarist di Meola leads an ensemble rich with harmonic settings, surging rhythms and intriguing textures. His musical companions include Argentine pianist Mario Parmisano, Moroccan percussionist Rhani Krija and Hungarian drummer Peter KaszasBlue Note Milano. +39 02 6901 6888.

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Eliane Elias photo by Bonnie Perkinson

Brad Mehldau photo by Tony Gieske.


Live Jazz: Jackie Ryan in a Jazz Bakery Movable Feast at the Musicians Institute

November 3, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles. Jackie Ryan made one of her far too rare Southland appearances on Saturday night. The program was a Jazz Bakery Movable Feast at the Musicians Institute featuring Ryan with the stellar backing of tenor saxophonist Rickey Woodard, pianist Tamir Hendelman, drummer Dean Koba and bassist Alex Frank.

Jackie Ryan

Jackie Ryan

That’s an impressive combination of talent, and the result was a stunning blend of vocal and instrumental jazz.

Ryan has always been a versatile, expressive singer, comfortable in several languages, an effective interpreter of bossa nova classics often in their original Portuguese. Add to that her strong sense of rhythmic swing and effective story-telling mastery.

Rickey Woodard

Those qualities, and more, were all present in her dynamic Saturday night appearance. Additionally noticeable in her rendering of an appealing program of songs were Ryan’s engaging entertainment skills. Interacting humorously with her highly receptive audience, sharing the spotlight with Woodard and the other players, introducing songs with a narrative describing their background, she offered a complete package, energized by the rich jazz qualities that are at the center of her performance art.

Among the highlights of an evening filled with memorable moments: a group of warmly intimate Brazilian songs from Milton Nascimento and Antonio Carlos Jobim, highlighted by an especially touching version of Jobim’s “Louisa”; a passionate rendering of “I Love You Porgy,” prefaced by Ryan’s telling of the song’s meaning in the context of the opera Porgy and Bess; a briskly swinging “I Just Found Out About Love”; a laid-back “Sleeping Bee”; a soaring, blues-driven take on “Georgia,” featuring a scene-stealing solo from Woodard; and more.

Rickey Woodard, Dean Koba, Alex Frank, Tamir Hendelman

Ryan was backed throughout by the sort of sturdy support that most singers dream of having, and often do not. Hendelman’s highly praised accompaniment for singers was present in every note he played; Koba and Frank laid down an irresistibly bouyant rhythmic flow; and Woodard’s playing, as noted above, provided the perfect, musically illuminating musical partnership.

The only thing missing in this otherwise superb musical evening was a second set. And when we left the theatre, the only remaining desire was the wish for Ryan to make more frequent trips south to gift L.A. with the many pleasures of her music.

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Photos by Faith Frenz.

 


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