HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEKEND IN LOS ANGELES

August 18, 2015

By Don Heckman

Wednesday August 19 at Catalina Bar & Grill

Sally Kellerman

Sally Kellerman

She may be best known for her high visibility role as “Hot Lips Houlihan” in the film M*A*S*H.  But Sally Kellerman has been a gifted singer since she was a teen-ager.  And in her post-acting career, Sally has displayed the qualities of a musical artist with the imaginative skills to move across genres reaching from pop and country to blues and jazz.  Appropriately, and convincingly, her current performances are headlined “A Little Jazz, a Little Blues, a Little Rock ‘n’ Roll.”  Expect to enjoy every minute.

Catalina Bar & Grill  (323) 466-2210.

 

Wednesday August 19 at Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.

Pat Senatore

Pat Senatore

Veteran bassist Pat Senatore has played with just about every performer in the music world, regardless of genre, whenever he isn’t serving as the music director for Herb Alpert’s Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc. or providing solid backing for the club’s diversified line up of acts.  This time, however, Pat takes center stage for an evening he describes as “Pat Senatore’s Big Bad B-Day Celebration.” Joining him is a stellar list of players, including Steve Hufsteter, Chuck Manning, Tina Raymond, his Ascensione Trio, featuring Josh Nelson, and probably more.  Don’t miss the fun.

Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Friday August 21 at Live Oak Unitarian Universalist in Goleta CA.

Teka

Singer/guitarist Teka is most frequently heard in her home territory around Santa Barbara.  As she will for this performance.  But it’s well worth a trip north for Angelenos to hear this extraordinarily gifted performer in live action with her New Bossa group. The Southland is blessed with a plethora of Brazilian artists.  But Teka is one of a kind, an artist who balances a strikingly authentic foundation of Brazilian roots, tracing to her youthful years in Sao Paulo, with the imaginative inventiveness of a mature jazz artist.  Experience the live thrills of Brazil up close and swinging.

Live Oak Unitarian Universalist in Goleta CA.

Friday August 21 at Catalina Bar & Grill

Mark Winkler

Mark Winkler

Mark Winkler

Singer/lyricist Winkler celebrates the release of his latest album, the appropriately titled, Jazz and Other Four Letter Words.  The whimsical Winkler isn’t kidding about the importance of his commitment to jazz, which has evolved into the foundation of his vocal art.   And he underscores the title of the album by listing a few of the “Four Letter Words” he has in mind — words such as Jazz, Cool, Neat, Bird, Duke, Prez and Mark.  All will no doubt be present in this exhilarating jazz evening, no doubt enhanced by the guest star presence of his frequent singing partner, Cheryl Bentyne.

Catalina Bar & Grill  (323) 466-2210.

Saturday August 22 at Catalina Bar & Grill

Terry Bozio

Terry Bozio

Terry Bozio

In a career reaching back to the seventies, dynamic rock drummer Terry Bozio has been an especially high voltage performer with Missing Persons and Frank Zappa.  Always an exciting performer to hear in his appearances with a range of bands, he now reveals his leadership qualities as well, bringing his irresistible groove to a rare Southland club performance.

Catalina Bar & Grill  (323) 466-2210.

Sally Kellerman photo by Bonnie Perkinson, Pat Senatore photo by Bob Barry.

 


Live Music: The Great American Songbook is Alive and Well at Catalina Bar & Grill with Barbara Morrison, Stephanie Haynes and Jackie Ryan

July 3, 2015
Roger Crane

Roger Crane

 By Roger Crane

Los Angeles.  In 2013 jazz pianist, Keith Jarrett, who issued a series of albums that featured the standards, was asked “What do standards mean to you and why have you recorded so many?” Jarrett replied, “First of all, they are anything but standard by today’s standards. But they are exceptional.” These exceptional songs as Jarrett observed “came rushing in from the 1920s through the early 1950s” but, most intensely in a 2-decade span, 1925 – 1945. The cream of the standards are said to make up the Great American Songbook (GAS). Although pervasive, the origin of this term is uncertain. It was first used as a title of a live 1972 Atlantic album by singer Carmen McRae. In that same year, composer and musicologist Alec Wilder published a successful book titled American Popular Song (Oxford Press), perhaps the first book to definitively assess the standards as worthy of serious discussion.

Catalina Popescu

Catalina Popescu

On last Tuesday night at Catalina Popescu’s long-running Hollywood jazz venue, Catalina’s Bar and Grill, over twenty of those exceptional GAS songs were performed by three very talented vocalists.

Barbara Morrison

Barbara Morrison

 

The delightful Barbara Morrison kicked off the show with a series of Harold Arlen songs, beginning with his spare, hymn-like “My Shining Hour.” She sang “Stormy Weather” accompanied beautifully by only John Clayton’s bass. She closed with another Arlen ballad, the remarkable ”Last Night When We Were Young,” which Frank Sinatra liked so much he recorded it twice. In the mix, of course, Morrison included some swinging Arlen tunes such as “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive,” demonstrating all the vivacious flare needed to make an audience happy. She is bottled sunshine, a visual delight as well as aural and. if you don’t find yourself smiling in her presence – well, check your pulse.

Stephanie Haynes

Stephanie Haynes

I have often thought of Stephanie Haynes as a well-kept secret and she is too talented to be so overlooked. She has graced Southern Californians with her warm, luxuriant alto for many decades, but has not recorded half – or even a third – as often as her talents dictate. Haynes chose the songs of composer Harry Warren, who probably wrote more well-known songs than either Gershwin or Kern. But, although many listeners know his songs, they do not know his name. Haynes’ Catalina segment was an impressive  demonstration of how the familiar can be made fresh and how the arcane can appear familiar. For example she sang the lesser-known “Friendly Star” (from the movie Summer Stock) as a waltz, although it was written in four. “Summer Night” (from the movie Sing Me a Love Song) is perhaps even more neglected but Haynes’ rendition makes one wonder why this song, one of Warren’s more pure and beautiful melodies, never became a standard. It deserves much more recognition. Although Fats Waller had fun with Warren’s “Sweet and Slow,” the song is mostly ignored. Thankfully, Haynes sang it both sweet and slow as dictated by Al Dubin’s sexy lyrics. Many other Warren songs were performed of course, including “This Is Always,” and each was a gem. Haynes was in superb voice and, once again – as she does each time she performs – proved that she is one of the finest jazz singers.

Jackie Ryan

Jackie Ryan

Jackie Ryan lives in the Bay area but, on occasion, blesses Angelinos with her deep, honey-rich contralto. For the show’s third and final segment, she selected songs written by or associated with Duke Ellington. Ryan is a master of ballads and mesmerized the Catalina patrons with that famous song about the weary diva “Sophisticated Lady,” performing it in a medley with Billy Strayhorn’s “Lush Life.” Ryan’s smoky voice and flexibility make her a natural fit for torch songs but she is the complete singer and can handle rhythm tunes with ease and she also romped at a swinging beat on such tunes as “Duke’s Place.” Thankfully, Ryan introduced the audience to two lesser known Ducal songs, “Kissing Bug” and the even more obscure “You Better Know It,” two songs kept alive by such vocalists as Nina Simone and June Christy.

Morrison, Haynes and Ryan were given sympathetic support by their musical director Doug McDonald. In addition to his own guitar work, the band included pianist Josh Nelson, bassist John Clayton, and Paul Kreibich at the drum set. The arrangements and accompaniment were, to fall back on a cliché, exemplary. They were also apposite and unobtrusive and, since this was a night to focus on the song, let the songs and the singers take center stage as they should. Collectively, the Great

American Songbook constitutes one of the great cultural achievements of the twentieth century. A warm thanks to Merle Kreibich for continuing to present the very best in jazz and thanks to the Catalina staff and the patrons for their courtesy and attentiveness. The room was full and for a Great American Songbook event that was encouraging. The GAS flame was alive and burning bright for one stellar night in Hollywood.

* * * * * * * *

Photos Bob Barry/Jazzography

 


Live Music: Sara Gazarek and Josh Nelson at the Artistic Piano Gallery

March 15, 2015

By Don Heckman

Medford, Oregon. The creative interaction between a jazz vocal artist and his/her accompanist is one of the most sensitive encounters in the entire musical world. All of which was on fascinating display Friday night in the performance of singer Sara Gazarek and pianist Josh Nelson at Medford’s Artistic Piano Gallery.

The talented young artists have already had a long musical relationship. And the far-reaching, irresistible musical quality of their performance called up memories of such classic jazz singer/accompanist connections as Ella Fitzgerald and Joe Pass, Tony Bennett and Bill Evans.

But the Gazarek/Nelson duo made it clear – as they do in all their performances – that their linkage is founded upon interactive, musically exploratory adventures.

Josh Nelson and Sara Gazarek

Start with the fact that Nelson is a superb arranger/pianist who founds his interpretive interaction upon the classical view of the piano as an orchestra in itself. Gazarek has her own arranging ideas, blending them with Nelson’s vision, adding her gripping story-telling qualities to the lyrics of every song she touches.

All of which resulted in a compelling performance within the Artistic Piano Gallery’s warm and intimate setting.

The Gazarek/Nelson program was a combination of evergreens from the Great American Songbook sprinkled with original songs by both artists. The first half of the program was enhanced by such classics as “Without A Song,” “No Moon At All,” along with Duke Ellington’s “Mood Indigo” and “Single Petal Of A Rose.” Add to that the Bonnie Raitt hit, “I Can’t Make You Love Me,” Joao Gilberto’s bossa nova tribute to a duck, “O Pato” and Nelson’s “Petit Papillon.” The set was topped off by a high velocity romp through “Sunny Side of the Street,” featuring a set of bebop variations sung and played in unison by voice and piano.

The second set was shorter, but no less engaging, featuring – among its many highlights – “Someone To Watch Over Me” and “Come Rain Or Come Shine,” and a group of songs covering various aspects of love. Among them: the original, “I Don’t Love You Anymore,” “Where Is Love?” and “Love You Madly.”

A performance with half those songs would be impressive for most vocal artists. But in the talented hands (and voice) of Nelson and Gazarek it offered an evening of the jazz vocal art at its best.

Call it a high point in this season’s Siskiyou Music Project, which continues from April 2 through May 27 with programs reaching from jazz (Ken Peplowski) to country music (Tim & Myles Thompson) and more. Click HERE for details about the rest of the Project’s programs.


Picks of the Week: October 27 – November 2

October 27, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

John Pisano

John Pisano

– Oct. 28. (Tues.) Guitar Night with John Pisano. Like all of John Pisano’s Guitar Nights, this week’s features a world class assemblage of players: in addition to Pisano, you’ll hear guitarist Barry Zweig, bassist Chris Conner and drummer Tim Pleasant. Viva Cantina.  (818) 845-2425.

– Oct. 28,. (Tues.) The Hagen Quartet. The much honored string quartet, which includes three siblings, makes a rare Southland appearance. They’ll perform quartets by Mozart, Shostakovich and Brahms. The Samueli Theatre in the Segerstrom Center for the Arts.  (714) 556-2787.

– Oct. 28. (Tues.) Julie Kelly celebrates the release of her new CD Happy To Be backed by an all star band featuring Bill Cunliffe, Joe La Barbera, Anthony Wilson and Bob Sheppard with guest vocalist John Proulx. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

Lee Konitz

Lee Konitz

– Oct. 31. (Fri.) Something Cool: Celebrating Jazz Sounds of the Cool School. The Los Angeles Jazz Institute presents another of their immensely entertaining vistas of broad areas of jazz, This time the event encompasses four areas of cool jazz: Woody Herman and the Four Brothers sound: the music of Lennie Tristano and his Disciples; The Birth of the Cool and its participants; and West Coast Cool. The stellar list of participants is topped by the iconic Lee Konitz as Special Guest of Honor. The programs take pace at the Sheraton Gateway Hotel. Something Cool. The L.A. Jazz Institute  (562) 200- 5477.

– Oct. 30. (Thurs.) John Proulx Trio. Pianist Proulx is a prime instrumentalist. And he is now matching that skill with his engaging work as a jazz vocalist. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

– Oct. 30. – Nov. 2.) (Thurs. – n. ) The Los Angeles PhilharmonicMozart and Beethoven, Esa-Pekka Salonen returns to conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic in a program featuring Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3. Disney Hall.  (323) 850-2000.

– Oct. 31. (Fri,) Bob Sheppard with the Pat Senatore Trio featuring Josh Nelson. In a week in which Southland music stages are filled with stellar instrumentalists, here’s one not to miss, with an up front saxophone stylings from Sheppard, and briskly swinging rhythm section work from Senatore’s Trio (featuring Nelson). Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Jackie Ryan

Jackie Ryan

– Nov. 1. (Sat,) Jackie Ryan featuring saxophonist Rickey Woodard. Although she’s one of the finest of vocal artists in the contemporary jazz scene, Jackie’s appearances in Southern California are far too rare. And she’ll be backed by Rickey Woodard’s fine tenor work. So don’t miss this one. A Jazz Bakery event at the Musicians Institute. (310) 271-9039.

– Nov. 1 & 2. (Sat. & Sun.) Helen Reddy. Australian-born Reddy was called “Queen of Pop” in the ’70s for her success in releasing hit songs. Two of the best-known are “I Am Woman” and “I Don’t Know How To Love Him.” She’ll no doubt perform those and more of her dozens of memorable hits. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

Washington D.C.

– Oct. 29 (Wed.) Maria Muldaur. Singer Muldaur’s warm voice was one of the appealing sounds of the folk revival of the early ’60s, followed bv her ’70s hit single, “Midnight at the Oasis.” And she continues her work as a contemporary exponent of all forms of Americana and roots music. Blues Alley.  (202) 337-4141.

New York City

– Oct. 28 – Nov. 1 (Tues.. – Sat.) Ron Carter Nonet. Carter’s one of the most (perhaps the most) recorded bassist in history. But he’s not often recognized for his prime skills as a composer and arranger. Here’s a chance to experience those skills up close and personal. Birdland. . (212) 581-3080.

Kenny Garrett

Kenny Garrett

– Oct. 30 – Nov. 1/ (Thurs. – Sat.) Kenny Garrett Quintet. Grammy-winning alto saxophonist Garrett has cruised the challenging territory from bop to post bop to avant-garde, playing with Duke Ellington and Miles Davis along the way. In the world of contemporary jazz saxophone, he’s the real deal. The Iridium.  (212) 582-2121.

Paris

– Oct. 31 (Fri,) Spyro Gyra. They’ve been in the vanguard of fusion and smooth jazz since they first arrived on the scene in the ’70s. But their award winning recordings are also rooted in solid mainstream skills. Paris New Morning.  +33 1 45 23 51 41.

Berlin

Becca Stevens

Becca Stevens

– Oct. 28. (Tues.) Becca Stevens. Eclectic singer Stevens is often identified as a jazz artist. But her considerable abilities also include a convincing facility in pop and blues, often supported by her guitar playing, A-Trane Jazz. +49 30 3132550.

Copenhagen

Ernie Wilkins Almost Big Band. Featuring vocalist Charenee Wade. St. Louis-born saxophonist/arranger/composer Wilkins spent the last decades of his life in Copenhagen, where he formed a mid-sized band., Called the “Almost Big Band” it was big enough (12 pieces) to serve as a vehicle for his adventurous arranging and composing. Since his death, the Band has continued under the direction of Nikolaj BentzonJazzhus Montmartre.  +45 31 72 34 94.

Milan

Stanley Carke– Oct. 30 & 31 (Thurs. & Fri.) The Stanley Clarke Band. Versatile bassist/bandleader Clarke has always led great ensembles of his own (when he wasn’t pairing up with Chick Corea). And he’s always been receptive to helping new talent along the way. This time out, his band features the impressive piano work of 16 year old prodigy Beka Gochiashvili from Tbilisi, Georgia. The Blue Note Milan.  +39 02 6901 6888.

Tokyo

– Oct. 31 – Nov. 2. (Fri. – Sun.) Goastt (The Ghost of a Sabre Tooth Tiger), featuring multi-instramentalists Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl, was formed by Lennon (John Lennon’s son) and musician/model Muhl in 1908. But they consider Midnight Sun, released in early 2014 to be their first significant album. The duo also describe their working relationship as singers and songwriters as similar to the working relationship between John Lennon and Paul McCartney, The Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.


Picks of the Week: Sept. 24 – 28

September 23, 2014

By Don Heckman

As the warm days of September wind to a close, while autumn is just beginning to arrive, the bookings are light at clubs and concert venues around the world, but there’s still some very special music to hear.

Los Angeles

Pat Senatore

Pat Senatore

– Sept. 25. (Thurs.) Pat Senatore Trio. Bassist Senatore and his trio – pianist Josh Nelson and drummer Mark Ferber play selections from his exciting new album Ascensione and a forecast of what to expect from his up-coming, soon to be released CD. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

– Sept. 26. (Fri,) Roumani & Sidiki Diabate and Rokia Traore. An extraordinary evening of music from Mali, featuring the father and son team of Diabates in a program of traditional sounds, as well as the imaginative works of singer/songwriter/guitarist Traore. A CAP UCLA event at Royce Hall.  (310) 825-2101.

Trey Anastasio

Trey Anastasio

-Sept. 26. (Fri.) Trey Anastasio with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. One of the founding members of Phish, the ever-adventurous Anastasio presents newly imagined orchestral versions of pieces he’s written over the past few decades. The Hollywood Bowl.  (323) 850-2000.

– Sept. 26 & 27 (Fri. & Sat.) Chambers, Herbert & Ellis. The best way to describe this musically fascinating vocal trio is to say “Lambert, Hendricks & Ross. But Chambers, Herbert & Ellis add their own unique touches as well. Click HERE to read an iRoM review of the trio in action. The Gardenia.  (323) 467-7444.

– Sept. 26 – 28. (Fri. – Sun.) Lenny White, Victor Bailey and Larry Coryell. A trio of the contemporary jazz world’s most versatile players. Expect to hear improvisational fireworks from drummer White, bassist Bailey and guitarist Coryell. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

Eliane Elias

Eliane Elias

Seattle

– Sept. 25 – 28. (Thurs. – Sun.) Eliane Elias. Sao Paulo’s gift to jazz continues to find fascinating creative links between her Brazilian roots and her compelling jazz piano and vocals. Click HERE to read a recent iRoM review of Elias and her superb trio. Jazz Alley.  (206) 441-9729.

New York City

– Sept, 23 – 27. (Tues. – Sat.) Fred Hersch, Esperanza Spalding and Richie Barshay. Pianist Hersch and bassist/singer Spalding may seem to be an odd couple. But with the talent they have, individually and collectively with drummer Barshay, musical delights will be on the menu. The Jazz Standard.  (212) 576-2232.

David Sanborn

David Sanborn

London

– Sept. 24 – 26. (Wed. – Fri.) The David Sanborn Trio featuring Joey DeFrancesco and Byron Landham. Alto saxophonist, one of the innovative players of his generation, is always a pleasure to hear. And he’ll no doubt take everything up a notch in company with the dynamic organ work of DeFrancesco and the solid groove of drummer Landham. Ronnie Scott’s.  +44 20 7439 0747.

Milan

– Sept. 24. (Wed.) Tierney Sutton. “After Blue – The Joni Project. On her seemingly non-stop quest to bring her imaginative approach to jazz vocalizing, Sutton has added the music of Joni Mitchell to her extraordinary performances. (And on her After Blue CD, as well.) Blue Note Milan. / +39 02 6901 6888.


Live Music and Humor: Jay Leonhart and Josh Nelson at Vitello’s

August 11, 2014

 By Don Heckman

Studio City, CA. What is there to say about a bassist who is a prime jazz player, sings, and writes his own hilariously whimsical songs?

A lot, actually, if his name is Jay Leonhart, who had a full house audience in stitches at Vitello’s Saturday night, aided by the brilliant support of pianist Josh Nelson.

Josh Nelson and Jay Leonhart

Josh Nelson and Jay Leonhart

But no description of what Leonhart did in his 1½ hour set can do full justice to the unique musical range of his performance – not surprising given a performance and recording resume that includes gigs with artists reaching from Tony Bennett to James Taylor and Marian McPartland to Bucky Pizzarelli and beyond.

Jay Leonhart

Jay Leonhart

He came on stage and immediately settled any L.A. doubts about whether a somewhat lesser-known New York bassist with a reputation as a Bob Dorough and Dave Frishberg-like instrumental humorist could cut it as a jazz player. Suffice to say he did so, from first tune to the last, even though one of his best-known songs is “It’s Impossible to Sing and Play the Bass.”

Despite that whimsical reservation, his songs are at the center of any Leonhart show.  And he offered a non-stop array of appealing goodies. Among the many highlights:

– “Bass Aboard A Plane” – describing a problem faced by all bassists.
– “Me and Lenny” – in which Leonhart, sitting in first class, unexpectedly finds Leonard Bernstein next to him on a flight from New York to Los Angeles.
– Add to that: a song about history’s first double bass; a song inspired by Ivan Lins during a trip to Brazil; a song about an invasion of aliens from Venus titled “They’re Coming To Get Me.”
– A song about “Life on the Road.”
– As well as “Double Cross,” written after Leonhart had read a Robert Ludlum spy thriller.
All were masterful blends of humor, often sardonic, with catchy melodies and colorful harmonic schemes.

Josh Nelson

Josh Nelson

Further displaying his versatility, Leonhart included his own versions of “Stay Cool” (directly after the Bernstein song, of course) and Eddie Harris” “Freedom Jazz Dance.”

I mentioned Josh Nelson’s “brilliant support” on piano. And it was all that and more. Leonhart’s charts were broadly conceived, with numerous interactive as well as paired passages between bass and piano. As well as many areas in which Nelson had to interact, start and stop with spontaneous cues between both players. And it all happened perfectly – a pair of gifted players operating on precisely the same wave length.

There’s a lot I could add.  But none of it would be as on target as Leonhart himself in action. And the thought that kept recurring as we headed home after the performance was “When will Jay be back in L.A. again?.” Let’s hope it’s soon.

Photos by Faith Frenz.

 

 


Picks of the Week: August 4 – 10 in Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago, New York City, London, Berlin, Stockholm, Moscow and Tokyo

August 4, 2014

By Don Heckman

Los Angeles

– Aug. 5. (Tues.) John Pisano’s Guitar Night. The official release party for Pat Kelley‘s new CD, Overtones 4 Two Guitars. With Pisano, Kelley, Kendall Kay, drums, and John Belzaguy, bass. Viva Cantina. (818) 845-2425.

– Aug. 5 & 6. (Tues. & Wed.) The Gypsy Allstars. If you like the Gipsy Kings, you’ll be equally impressed by the Gypsy All-Stars who play a similar repertoire, energized by Gipsy Kings alumni Ced Leonardi and Mario Reyes. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Herbie Hancock

Herbie Hancock

– Aug. 6. (Wed.) Herbie Hancock and Gregory Porter. A classic jazz night at the Bowl. On the bill: orchestral renderings (arranged by Vince Mendoza) of selections from the Hancock songbook; and a program of song by jazz vocal star, Porter. The Hollywood Bowl. (323) 850-2000.

– Aug. 7. (Thurs.) The Haden Triplets. Charlie Haden’s talented three daughters carry on the Haden tradition of family music making Skirball Cultural Center.  (310) 440-4500.

– Aug. 7. (Thurs.) Michael McDonald and Toto. McDonald and Toto have been getting together to make music for years, dating back to the 1986 album, Farenheit.  Expect musical excitement from this compelling musical reunion.  The Greek Theatre. (323) 665-5857

 

Judy Wexler

Judy Wexler

– Aug. 7. (Thurs.) Judy Wexler. The versatile musical story-teller with a briskly swinging style performs with the sterling backing of Jeff Colella, piano, Kenny Wild, bass and Devin Kelly, Drums. The Merc at 42051 Main St. in Temecula. (866) 653-8696.

– Aug. 8. (Fri.) Kamasi Washington and the Next Step. Saxophonist Washington is rapidly establishing himself as one of the Southland’s must-hear jazz artists. Jazz at LACMA. (323) 857-6000.

– Aug. 8 & 9. (Fri. & Sat.) Gladys Knight and Kool and the Gang. Grammy-winning soul queen Knight is joined by funksters Kool and the Gang for an evening of rhythmic and vocal delights. The Hollywood Bowl.  (323) 850-2000.

– Aug. 8 & 9. (Fri. & Sat.) Jay Leonhart and Josh Nelson. Bassist Leonhart is often called “the wittiest man in jazz” for his whimsical narratives, but he’s also a world class player as well. Writing in the L.A. Times, Don Heckman described Leonhart as “the Fred Astaire of jazz.” The pairing of Leonhart with the gifted young pianist Josh Nelson should produce some irresistibly intriguing musical results. On Friday at Vitello’s;  on Saturday at Cornerstone Music Conservatory on West Pico Blvd.

Stanley Jordan

Stanley Jordan

– Aug. 8 – 10. (Fri. – Sun.) Stanley Jordan Trio. There’s no one quite like Jordan, who plays guitar with a tapping technique that allows him to create textures, sounds and harmonic clusters rarely heard on the instrument. Add to that his inventive gifts as a jazz improviser. Don’t miss this chance to hear this remarkable artist in action. Catalina Bar & Grill.  (323) 466-2210.

– Aug. 9. (Sat.) The Susie Hansen Latin Jazz Band. Violinist Susie Hansen may be a blonde mid-Westerner, but she’s been leading authentically exciting Latin jazz bands for more than two decades. since the early ’90s. As Don Heckman noted in the L.A. Times, “Susie creates a brand of music that is as physically moving as it is intellectually stimulating.” Knott’s Berry Farm. 8039 Beach Blvd., Buena Park.  (714) 220-5200.

– Aug. 9. (Sat.) The Tom Peterson Quartet. Saxophonist and woodwind artist Peterson is a first call player, with good reasons. Here’s a chance to hear him in the spotlight with a stellar rhythm section. Vibrato Grill Jazz…etc.  (310) 474-9400.

Seattle

Fourplay

– Aug. 7 – 10. (Thurs. – Sun.) Fourplay. Bob James, Chuck Loeb, Nathan East, Harvey Mason. They’ve got a reputation for funk and contemporary styles, but this veteran band of superb, veteran jazz artists bring everything they have to whatever genre-of-the-moment they’re playing. Jazz Alley.  (206) 441-9729.

Chicago

– August 7. (Thurs.) Charles McPherson. Well-known for his long run with the Charles Mingus band of the ’60s, alto saxophonist/flutist McPherson is also a convincing practitioner of classic bebop. Jazz Showcase.  (312) 360-0234.

New York City

– Aug. 5 – 10. (Tues. – Sun.)Django Reinhardt NY Festival “15th Anniversary Celebration.” It’s one of the great annual jazz celebrations, recalling the glories of the great Django Reinhardt with some of his finest musical descendants. Birdland.  (212) 581-3080.

London

Michel_Legrand

Michel_Legrand

– Aug. 8 & 9. (Fri. & Sat.) Michel Legrand Trio. Pianist/composer/songwriter does it all – writing songs (often with the Bergmans), scoring films, performing with his jazz trio – and he does it with stunning brilliance. He isn’t heard often in clubs, so don’t overlook this rare opportunity to hear him. Ronnie Scott’s  +44 (0)20 7439 0747.

Berlin

– Aug. 6 & 7. (Wed. & Thurs.) Roy Hargrove Quintet. Trumpeter Hargrove and his band were in Paris last week. Keeping his numerous European fans happy, Hargrove appears this week in Berlin. A-Trane Jazz. +49 30 3132550.

Stockholm

– Aug. 9. (Sat.) Sonny Fortune Quintet. “In the Spirit of Miles.” Alto saxophonist/woodwind player Fortune, a veteran of Miles Davis’ group of the mid-’70s – brings striking authenticity to his Davis musical celebration. Fasching Jazz Nightclub.  08-20 00 66.

Moscow

– Aug. 5. (Tues.) Alexander Vinitsky. Russian guitarist Vinitsky may not be well-known (yet) in the U.S., but he’s a gifted player who deserves wider international exposure. Igor Butman Jazz Club.  (+7 495) 792-21-09.

Tokyo

– Aug. 9 & 10. (Sat. & Sun.) Akiko Yano Trio. Eclectic artist Yano moves comfortably from piano playing to composition to singing and songwriting. This time out, she’s in a trio setting with bassist Will Lee and drummer Chris Parker. Blue Note Tokyo.  +81 3-5485-0088.


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